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pertinacious

[pur-tn-ey-shuh s]
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adjective
  1. holding tenaciously to a purpose, course of action, or opinion; resolute.
  2. stubborn or obstinate.
  3. extremely or objectionably persistent: a pertinacious salesman from whom I could not escape.
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Origin of pertinacious

First recorded in 1620–30; pertinaci(ty) + -ous
Related formsper·ti·na·cious·ly, adverbper·ti·na·cious·ness, noun

Synonyms

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1. persevering. 2. dogged.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for pertinacious

Historical Examples

  • And it was the presence of that pertinacious ship-chandler which had started them.

    'Twixt Land & Sea

    Joseph Conrad

  • Behind these was the agent, punctual and pertinacious, who had come for the rent.

    The Paliser case

    Edgar Saltus

  • And he escaped from pertinacious Mr. Dawson with some alacrity.

    Half a Hero

    Anthony Hope

  • Again they laughed at the child's pertinacious fancy for a night-ramble.

    Short Story Writing

    Charles Raymond Barrett

  • "They are not the only pertinacious ones," the priest replied.

    The Art of Disappearing

    John Talbot Smith


British Dictionary definitions for pertinacious

pertinacious

adjective
  1. doggedly resolute in purpose or belief; unyielding
  2. stubbornly persistent
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Derived Formspertinaciously, adverbpertinacity (ˌpɜːtɪˈnæsɪtɪ) or pertinaciousness, noun

Word Origin

C17: from Latin pertināx, from per- (intensive) + tenāx clinging, from tenēre to hold
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for pertinacious

adj.

1620s, from pertinacy (late 14c.; see pertinacity) + -ous. Related: Pertinaciously.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper