phonics

[fon-iks or for 2, foh-niks]
noun (used with a singular verb)
  1. a method of teaching reading and spelling based upon the phonetic interpretation of ordinary spelling.
  2. Obsolete. phonetics.

Origin of phonics

First recorded in 1675–85; phon- + -ics
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for phonics

Historical Examples of phonics

  • Especial attention is called to the system of phonics developed.

  • There should be at least two ten-minute lessons in phonics each day.

    How to Teach Phonics

    Lida M. Williams

  • From the first day a definite place on the program should be given to phonics.

    How to Teach Phonics

    Lida M. Williams

  • Phonics is not a method of teaching reading, but it is a necessary part of every good, modern method.

    How to Teach Phonics

    Lida M. Williams

  • As new words are met containing known sounds, the pupils should apply their knowledge of phonics.

    How to Teach Phonics

    Lida M. Williams


British Dictionary definitions for phonics

phonics

noun (functioning as singular)
  1. an obsolete name for acoustics (def. 1)
  2. a method of teaching people to read by training them to associate letters with their phonetic values
Derived Formsphonic, adjectivephonically, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for phonics
n.

1680s, "science of sound," from Greek phone "sound" (see fame (n.)) + -ics. As a method of teaching reading it is first attested 1908, though the system dates from 1844.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper