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QUIZ
TAKE JOY IN ACING THIS QUIZ ON “PRIDE” SYNONYMS
Hold your head up high as you embark on this quiz that explores some of the synonyms and meanings of “pride.”
Question 1 of 7
What does "dignity" mean?

Origin of pile

1
First recorded in 1400–50; late Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin pīla “pillar, pier, pile of stone”

Other definitions for pile (2 of 5)

pile2
[ pahyl ]
/ paɪl /

noun
a cylindrical or flat member of wood, steel, concrete, etc., often tapered or pointed at the lower end, hammered vertically into soil to form part of a foundation or retaining wall.
Heraldry. an ordinary in the form of a wedge or triangle coming from one edge of the escutcheon, from the chief unless otherwise specified.
Archery. the sharp head or striking end of an arrow, usually of metal and of the form of a wedge or conical nub.
verb (used with object), piled, pil·ing.
to furnish, strengthen, or support with piles.
to drive piles into.

Origin of pile

2
First recorded before 1000; Middle English pil(e) “pointed missile, arrow, dart,” Old English pīl “pointed stick, shaft,” from Latin pīlum “throwing spear, javelin”

Other definitions for pile (3 of 5)

pile3
[ pahyl ]
/ paɪl /

noun
a fabric with a surface of upright yarns, cut or looped, as corduroy, Turkish toweling, velvet, and velveteen.
such a surface.
one of the strands in such a surface.
soft, fine hair or down.
wool, fur, or pelage.

Origin of pile

3
First recorded in 1300–50; Middle English piles “hair, plumage,” from Latin pilus “a hair”

Other definitions for pile (4 of 5)

pile4
[ pahyl ]
/ paɪl /

noun
Usually piles . a hemorrhoid.
piles , the condition of having hemorrhoids.

Origin of pile

4
First recorded in 1375–1425; late Middle English piles, pyles (plural), from Medieval Latin pili (masculine plural), from Latin pilae (feminine plural), literally, “balls” (from their shape); cf. pill1

Other definitions for pile (5 of 5)

pile5
[ pahyl ]
/ paɪl /

noun
the lower of two dies for coining by hand.

Origin of pile

5
First recorded in 1350–1400; Middle English pil, pile, pyl “reverse of a coin,” from Medieval Latin pīla, special use of Latin pīla pile1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use pile in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for pile (1 of 3)

pile1
/ (paɪl) /

noun
verb
See also pile up

Word Origin for pile

C15: via Old French from Latin pīla stone pier

British Dictionary definitions for pile (2 of 3)

pile2
/ (paɪl) /

noun
a long column of timber, concrete, or steel that is driven into the ground to provide a foundation for a vertical load (a bearing pile) or a group of such columns to resist a horizontal load from earth or water pressure (a sheet pile)
heraldry an ordinary shaped like a wedge, usually displayed point-downwards
verb (tr)
to drive (piles) into the ground
to provide or support (a structure) with piles

Word Origin for pile

Old English pīl, from Latin pīlum

British Dictionary definitions for pile (3 of 3)

pile3
/ (paɪl) /

noun
textiles
  1. the yarns in a fabric that stand up or out from the weave, as in carpeting, velvet, flannel, etc
  2. one of these yarns
soft fine hair, fur, wool, etc

Word Origin for pile

C15: from Anglo-Norman pyle, from Latin pilus hair
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for pile

pile
[ pīl ]

n.
A hemorrhoid.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Other Idioms and Phrases with pile

pile

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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