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View synonyms for pod

pod

1

[ pod ]

noun

  1. a somewhat elongated, two-valved seed vessel, as that of the pea or bean.
  2. a dehiscent fruit or pericarp having several seeds.
  3. Entomology.
    1. an insect egg case.
    2. a compact mass of insect eggs.
  4. a streamlined enclosure, housing, or detachable container of some kind:

    an engine pod under the wing of an aircraft.

  5. a protective compartment, as for an automobile's instrument gauges.
  6. I've agreed with some friends to become part of their pandemic pod.

  7. Mining. an orebody that has an elongated or lenticular shape.
  8. Radio and Television Slang. a cluster of brief commercials or spot announcements.


verb (used without object)

, pod·ded, pod·ding.
  1. to produce pods.
  2. to swell out like a pod.

pod

2

[ pod ]

noun

  1. a group of aquatic animals, especially marine mammals:

    a pod of walruses.

  2. a small flock of birds.

pod

3

[ pod ]

noun

  1. podcast ( def ): I'll be podding about the film next week.

    What pods do you listen to?

    I'll be podding about the film next week.

    We should pod all the discussions we're having leading up to our trip.

pod

4

[ pod ]

noun

  1. the straight groove or channel in the body of certain augers or bits.
  2. Carpentry. pad 1( def 15b ).

POD

5

abbreviation for

  1. port of debarkation.

pod-

6
  1. a learned borrowing from Greek meaning “foot,” used in the formation of compound words: pododynia.

-pod

7
  1. a combining form meaning “one having a foot” of the kind or number specified by the initial element; often corresponding to New Latin class names ending in -poda, with -pod used in English to name a single member of such a class: cephalopod. Compare -ped ( def ).

P.O.D.

8

abbreviation for

  1. pay on delivery.
  2. Post Office Department.

p.o.'d

9

[ pee-ohd ]

adjective

, Slang.

pod

1

/ pɒd /

noun

  1. a straight groove along the length of certain augers and bits
  2. the socket that holds the bit in a boring tool


pod

2

/ pɒd /

noun

  1. a small group of animals, esp seals, whales, or birds

pod

3

/ pɒd /

noun

    1. the fruit of any leguminous plant, consisting of a long two-valved case that contains seeds and splits along both sides when ripe
    2. the seedcase as distinct from the seeds
  1. any similar fruit
  2. a streamlined structure attached by a pylon to an aircraft and used to house a jet engine ( podded engine ), fuel tank, armament, etc
  3. an enclosed cabin suspended from a cable or a big wheel, for carrying passengers

verb

  1. tr to remove the pod or shell from (peas, beans, etc)
  2. intr (of a plant) to produce pods

POD

4

abbreviation for

  1. pay on delivery

abbreviation for

  1. print on demand

-pod

5

combining form

  1. indicating a certain type or number of feet

    arthropod

    tripod

–pod

1
  1. A suffix meaning “foot.” It is used in the scientific names of the members of many groups of organisms, such as arthropod, an organism having “jointed feet,” and sauropod, a dinosaur having “lizard feet.” It is also used in the names of different kinds of limbs or limblike body parts, such as pseudopod, the “false foot” of an amoeba.


pod

2

/ pŏd /

  1. A fruit or seed case that usually splits along two seams to release its seeds when mature. Legumes, such as peas and beans, produce pods.
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Other Words From

  • pod·like adjective
  • un·pod·ded adjective
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Word History and Origins

Origin of pod1

First recorded in 1680–90; apparently back formation from podder “gatherer of peas (as from a garden)”; further origin uncertain)

Origin of pod2

An Americanism dating back to 1825–35; perhaps special (originally facetious) use of pod 1

Origin of pod3

First recorded in 2005–10; by shortening

Origin of pod4

First recorded in 1565–75; origin uncertain; perhaps a continuation of Old English pād “outer garment, cloak,” the socket being thought of as something that covers or hides from view what is held in it (though the phonology is irregular)

Origin of pod5

Combining form representing Greek poús (genitive podós ) foot

Origin of pod6

From New Latin, from Greek -pod-, stem of -pous, adjective derivative of poús; foot

Origin of pod7

First recorded in 1945–50; by shortening
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Word History and Origins

Origin of pod1

C16: of unknown origin

Origin of pod2

C19: of unknown origin

Origin of pod3

C17: perhaps back formation from earlier podware bagged vegetables, probably from pod, variant of cod ² + ware 1

Origin of pod4

from Greek -podos footed, from pous foot
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Example Sentences

Weganool fabric made with calotropis pod fibers, which are viewable on the left.

From Ozy

They usually travel in pods, too, so it’s especially odd this beluga was spotted alone.

I asked him if the rise of the learning pod will make existing disparities worse.

These pods will still be made up of public school students, who are getting some level of online instruction from public school teachers.

Sitting at the bow of a boat, they sniff the air blown toward them from a pod of orcas.

The Navy and Marine Corps versions of the F-35 have differing configurations and rely on an external gun pod.

But at Cheshire, prisoners rarely, if ever, leave their pod.

The faction leaders each take a colony pod and set out to form their own society on the new planet.

When he first tries the pods for himself, he fails to realize that a fly has made its way into the other pod.

Top adviser Eric Fehrnstrom told MSNBC that Santorum and Gingrich are “two peas in a pod—longtime Washington legislators.”

It bears a pod similar to that of the locust, to which it is related, containing eight to twelve beans.

Instantly it split, showing the gummed red seeds clinging to the inner walls of the sensitive pod.

The bark is light in colour; and the capsule pod contains a large quantity of down, of a brown tint, and exquisite silky softness.

It is very long--nearly twice as long as this page and looks much more like a stem than a seed-pod.

She and her kitten were as much alike as two peas in a pod—jet-black, and with beautiful yellow-green eyes.

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poculiform-poda