popple

1
[pop-uh l]
noun
  1. a poppling motion.

Origin of popple

1
1300–50; Middle English poplen; imitative; see -le

popple

2
[pop-uh l]
noun Northern U.S.
  1. a poplar of the genus Populus.

Origin of popple

2
before 1000; Middle English; Old English popul < Latin pōpulus
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for popple

Historical Examples of popple

  • The wind dragged a shirt-sleeve from the 'popple' or pebble which held it down.

    The Well-Beloved

    Thomas Hardy

  • To these we fastened cross pieces of "popple" and on this put a tick filled with wild hay and corn stalk leaves.

  • I was working in my field, throwing out manure, when I saw the prisoner come out of the popple thicket on Pritchard's place.

    The Adventures of Bobby Orde

    Stewart Edward White

  • He had lost track of his victim in the popple thicket, but had come across Kincaid's cap, which he had appropriated.

    The Adventures of Bobby Orde

    Stewart Edward White

  • We had been giving the ladies a pull about the harbour, and were passing the “Popple,” when her owner made his appearance on deck.


British Dictionary definitions for popple

popple

verb (intr)
  1. (of boiling water or a choppy sea) to heave or toss; bubble
  2. (often foll by along) (of a stream or river) to move with an irregular tumbling motionthe small rivulet poppled along over rocks and stones for half a mile

Word Origin for popple

C14: of imitative origin; compare Middle Dutch popelen to bubble, throb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012