presage

[ noun pres-ij; verb pres-ij, pri-seyj ]
/ noun ˈprɛs ɪdʒ; verb ˈprɛs ɪdʒ, prɪˈseɪdʒ /

noun

verb (used with object), pres·aged, pres·ag·ing.

verb (used without object), pres·aged, pres·ag·ing.

to make a prediction.
Archaic. to have a presentiment.

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Origin of presage

1350–1400; Middle English (noun) <Middle French presage<Latin praesāgium presentiment, forewarning, equivalent to praesāg(us) having a foreboding (prae-pre- + sāgus prophetic; cf. sagacious) + -ium-ium

OTHER WORDS FROM presage

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for presage

British Dictionary definitions for presage

presage

noun (ˈprɛsɪdʒ)

an intimation or warning of something about to happen; portent; omen
a sense of what is about to happen; foreboding
archaic a forecast or prediction

verb (ˈprɛsɪdʒ, prɪˈseɪdʒ)

(tr) to have a presentiment of
(tr) to give a forewarning of; portend
(intr) to make a prediction

Derived forms of presage

presageful, adjectivepresagefully, adverbpresager, noun

Word Origin for presage

C14: from Latin praesāgium presentiment, from praesāgīre to perceive beforehand, from sāgīre to perceive acutely
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012