profile

[proh-fahyl]

noun

verb (used with object), pro·filed, pro·fil·ing.

to draw a profile of.
to produce or present a history, description, or analysis of: The magazine will profile the candidate in its next issue.

Origin of profile

1650–60; (noun) < Italian prof(f)ilo, noun derivative of profilare “to delineate, outline,” equivalent to pro- pro-1 + -filare, derivative of filo “line, thread” < Latin fīlum
Related formspro·fil·er, nounhalf-pro·file, noun

Synonyms for profile

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for profile

Contemporary Examples of profile

Historical Examples of profile

  • Past K.'s profile Sidney could see the magnolia tree shaped like a heart.

    K

    Mary Roberts Rinehart

  • Abruptly the man turned in his chair to summon a waiter, and exposed his profile.

    The Black Bag

    Louis Joseph Vance

  • This resemblance was furthered by the fact that the man's profile was birdlike.

    The Slave Of The Lamp

    Henry Seton Merriman

  • I remained standing, my profile turned towards him at his request.

    My Double Life

    Sarah Bernhardt

  • She leaned forward, observing her profile; gravity seemed to be her mood.

    Alice Adams

    Booth Tarkington


British Dictionary definitions for profile

profile

noun

a side view, outline, or representation of an object, esp of a human face or head
a view or representation of an object, esp a building, in contour or outline
a short biographical sketch of a subject
a graph, table, or list of scores representing the extent to which a person, field, or object exhibits various tested characteristics or tendenciesa population profile
a vertical section of soil from the ground surface to the parent rock showing the different horizons
  1. a vertical section of part of the earth's crust showing the layers of rock
  2. a representation of such a section
the outline of the shape of a river valley either from source to mouth (long profile) or at right angles to the flow of the river (cross profile)

verb (tr)

to draw, write, or make a profile of
to cut out a shape from a blank (as of steel) with a cutter
Derived Formsprofilist (ˈprəʊfɪlɪst), noun

Word Origin for profile

C17: from Italian profilo, from profilare to sketch lightly, from pro- 1 + Latin fīlum thread
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for profile
n.

1650s, "a drawing of the outline of anything," from older Italian profilo "a drawing in outline," from profilare "to draw in outline," from pro- "forth" (see pro-) + filare "draw out, spin," from Late Latin filare "to spin, draw out a line," from filum "thread" (see file (v.)). Meaning "a side view" is from 1660s. Meaning "biographical sketch, character study" is from 1734.

v.

1715, "to represent in profile," from profile (n.) or Italian profilare. Meaning "to summarize a person in writing" is from 1948. Related: Profiled; profiling.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

profile in Medicine

profile

[prōfīl′]

n.

A side view of an object or structure, especially of the human head.
A formal summary or analysis of data, often in the form of a graph or table, representing distinctive features or characteristics.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Idioms and Phrases with profile

profile

see keep a low profile.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.