purported

[ per-pawr-tid, -pohr- ]
/ pərˈpɔr tɪd, -ˈpoʊr- /

adjective

reputed or claimed; alleged: We saw no evidence of his purported wealth.

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Origin of purported

First recorded in 1890–95; purport + -ed2

OTHER WORDS FROM purported

pur·port·ed·ly, adverbun·pur·port·ed, adjective

Definition for purported (2 of 2)

purport
[ verb per-pawrt, -pohrt, pur-pawrt, -pohrt; noun pur-pawrt, -pohrt ]
/ verb pərˈpɔrt, -ˈpoʊrt, ˈpɜr pɔrt, -poʊrt; noun ˈpɜr pɔrt, -poʊrt /

verb (used with object)

to present, especially deliberately, the appearance of being; profess or claim, often falsely: a document purporting to be official.
to convey to the mind as the meaning or thing intended; express or imply.

noun

the meaning, import, or sense: the main purport of your letter.
purpose; intention; object: the main purport of their visit to France.

Origin of purport

1375–1425; (v.) late Middle English purporten < Anglo-French purporter to convey, equivalent to pur- pro-1 + porter to carry (< Latin portāre); (noun) late Middle English < Anglo-French, derivative of the v.

OTHER WORDS FROM purport

pur·port·less, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for purported

British Dictionary definitions for purported (1 of 2)

purported
/ (pɜːˈpɔːtɪd) /

adjective

alleged; supposed; rumoureda purported two million dollar deal

Derived forms of purported

purportedly, adverb

British Dictionary definitions for purported (2 of 2)

purport

verb (pɜːˈpɔːt) (tr)

to claim (to be a certain thing, etc) by manner or appearance, esp falsely
(esp of speech or writing) to signify or imply

noun (ˈpɜːpɔːt)

meaning; significance
purpose; object; intention

Word Origin for purport

C15: from Anglo-French: contents, from Old French porporter to convey, from por- forth + porter to carry, from Latin portāre
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012