rage

[reyj]
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noun

verb (used without object), raged, rag·ing.


Idioms

    all the rage, widely popular or in style.

Origin of rage

1250–1300; (noun) Middle English < Old French < Late Latin rabia, Latin rabiēs madness, rage, derivative of rabere to rage; (v.) ragen < Old French ragier, derivative of rage (noun)
Related formsrage·ful, adjectiverag·ing·ly, adverb

Synonyms for rage

Synonym study

1. See anger.

Antonyms for rage

1. calm.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for rageful

Historical Examples of rageful

  • His first impulse was out of the natural heart, rageful, wounded vanity spurring it on.

    The Quickening

    Francis Lynde

  • From all sides the horizon drew near in black walls across which the heat-lightning wrote in rageful zigzags.

    Caybigan

    James Hopper

  • Whereat they were all sore aggrieved and rageful, and resolved that they would have yet another trial at Easter.

  • He met the stern look in Odin's eyes and the rageful look in Thor's eyes with smiling good humor.

  • From somewhere in the dense timber along the river came a sudden, rageful, shivering wail.


British Dictionary definitions for rageful

rage

noun

intense anger; fury
violent movement or action, esp of the sea, wind, etc
great intensity of hunger, sexual desire, or other feelings
aggressive behaviour associated with a specified environment or activityroad rage; school rage
a fashion or craze (esp in the phrase all the rage)
Australian and NZ informal a dance or party

verb (intr)

to feel or exhibit intense anger
(esp of storms, fires, etc) to move or surge with great violence
(esp of a disease or epidemic) to spread rapidly and uncontrollably
Australian and NZ informal to have a good time

Word Origin for rage

C13: via Old French from Latin rabiēs madness
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for rageful

rage

n.

c.1300, "madness, insanity; fit of frenzy; anger, wrath; fierceness in battle; violence of storm, fire, etc.," from Old French rage, raige "spirit, passion, rage, fury, madness" (11c.), from Medieval Latin rabia, from Latin rabies "madness, rage, fury," related to rabere "be mad, rave" (cf. rabies, which originally had this sense), from PIE *rebh- "violent, impetuous" (cf. Old English rabbian "to rage"). Similarly, Welsh (cynddaredd) and Breton (kounnar) words for "rage, fury" originally meant "hydrophobia" and are compounds based on the word for "dog" (Welsh ci, plural cwn; Breton ki). In 15c.-16c. it also could mean "rabies." The rage "fashion, vogue" dates from 1785.

rage

v.

mid-13c., "to play, romp," from rage (n.). Meanings "be furious; speak passionately; go mad" first recorded c.1300. Of things from 1530s. Related: Raged; raging.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with rageful

rage

see all the rage.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.