ragged

[rag-id]

adjective


Origin of ragged

First recorded in 1250–1300, ragged is from the Middle English word ragget. See rag1, -ed3
Related formsrag·ged·ly, adverbrag·ged·ness, noun

Synonyms for ragged

1. shabby, poor. 2. shredded, rent.

Antonyms for ragged

1. neat.

rag

2
[rag]Informal.

verb (used with object), ragged, rag·ging.

to scold.
to subject to a teasing, especially in an intense or prolonged way (often followed by on): Some of the boys were ragging on him about his haircut.
British. to torment with jokes; play crude practical jokes on.

noun

British. an act of ragging.

Origin of rag

2
First recorded in 1790–1800; origin uncertain

rag

3
[rag]

verb (used with object), ragged, rag·ging.

to break up (lumps of ore) for sorting.

Origin of rag

3
First recorded in 1870–75; origin uncertain

rag

4
[rag]

noun

a musical composition in ragtime: a piano rag.

verb (used with object), ragged, rag·ging.

to play (music) in ragtime.

Origin of rag

4
First recorded in 1895–1900; shortened form of ragtime
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for ragged

Contemporary Examples of ragged

Historical Examples of ragged

  • But the upper edges are ragged, torn by a wind not yet felt below.

    The Spenders

    Harry Leon Wilson

  • Once more I am counting the coppers, living on the ragged edge.

    Ballads of a Bohemian

    Robert W. Service

  • Enter Rumi-naui, torn and ragged, and covered with blood, with two attendants.

    Apu Ollantay

    Anonymous

  • In the evening a man came, ragged and tired, looking for something to eat.

    Ridgeway

    Scian Dubh

  • As far as the eye can reach in every direction are ragged peaks and spurs.


British Dictionary definitions for ragged

ragged

adjective

(of clothes) worn to rags; tattered
(of a person) dressed in shabby tattered clothes
having a neglected or unkempt appearanceragged weeds
having a loose, rough, or uneven surface or edge; jagged
uneven or irregulara ragged beat; a ragged shout
Derived Formsraggedly, adverbraggedness, noun

Word Origin for ragged

C13: probably from ragge rag 1

rag

1

noun

  1. a small piece of cloth, such as one torn from a discarded garment, or such pieces of cloth collectively
  2. (as modifier)a rag doll; a rag book; rag paper
a fragmentary piece of any material; scrap; shred
informal a newspaper or other journal, esp one considered as worthless, sensational, etc
informal an item of clothing
informal a handkerchief
British slang esp nautical a flag or ensign
lose one's rag to lose one's temper suddenly
See also rags

Word Origin for rag

C14: probably back formation from ragged, from Old English raggig; related to Old Norse rögg tuft

rag

2

verb rags, ragging or ragged (tr)

to draw attention facetiously and persistently to the shortcomings or alleged shortcomings of (a person)
British to play rough practical jokes on

noun

British a boisterous practical joke, esp one on a fellow student
(in British universities)
  1. a period, usually a week, in which various events are organized to raise money for charity, including a procession of decorated floats and tableaux
  2. (as modifier)rag day

Word Origin for rag

C18: of uncertain origin

rag

3

noun

a piece of ragtime music

verb rags, ragging or ragged

(tr) to compose or perform in ragtime

Word Origin for rag

C20: shortened from ragtime

rag

4

noun

a roofing slate that is rough on one side

Word Origin for rag

C13: of obscure origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for ragged
adj.

"rough, shaggy," c.1300, past participle adjective as though from a verb form of rag (n.). Cf. Latin pannosus "ragged, wrinkly," from pannus "piece of cloth." But the word might reflect a broader, older meaning; perhaps from or reinforced by Old Norse raggaðr "shaggy," via Old English raggig "shaggy, bristly, rough" (which, Barnhart writes, "was almost surely developed from Scandinavian"). Of clothes, early 14c.; of persons, late 14c. To run (someone) ragged is from 1915. Related: Raggedly; raggedness.

rag

n.

scrap of cloth, early 14c., probably from Old Norse rögg "shaggy tuft," earlier raggw-, or possibly from Old Danish rag (see rug), or a back-formation from ragged, It also may represent an unrecorded Old English cognate of Old Norse rögg. Watkins traces the Old Norse word through Proto-Germanic *rawwa-, from PIE root *reue- "to smash, knock down, tear up, uproot" (see rough (adj.)).

As an insulting term for "newspaper, magazine" it dates from 1734; slang for "tampon, sanitary napkin" is attested from 1930s (on the rag "menstruating" is from 1948). Rags "personal clothing" is from 1855 (singular), American English. Rags-to-riches "rise from poverty to wealth" is attested by 1896. Rag-picker is from 1860; rag-shop from 1829.

rag

v.

"scold," 1739, of unknown origin; perhaps related to Danish dialectal rag "grudge." Related: Ragged; ragging. Cf. bullyrag, ballarag "intimidate" (1807).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with ragged

ragged

see run one ragged.

rag

In addition to the idiom beginning with rag

  • rag doll

also see:

  • chew the fat (rag)
  • from rags to riches
  • glad rags
  • run ragged
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.