Ragnarok

[rahg-nuh-rok]
Also Rag·na·rök [rahg-nuh-rok, -rœk] /ˈrɑg nəˌrɒk, -ˌrœk/.

Origin of Ragnarok

1760–70; < Old Norse Ragnarǫk, equivalent to ragna, genitive of regin gods + rǫk fate, misread by some as Ragnarökkr literally, twilight of the gods; compare Götterdämmerung
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for ragnarok

Historical Examples of ragnarok

  • But his efforts can avail nothing until the day of Ragnarok.

    Told by the Northmen:

    E. M. [Ethel Mary] Wilmot-Buxton

  • Nothing, on Ragnarok, ever seemed to give warning before it killed.

    Space Prison

    Tom Godwin

  • Always, on Ragnarok, winter was coming or the brown death of summer.

    Space Prison

    Tom Godwin

  • "It's not what we did but what we do that we'll live or die by on Ragnarok," Lake said.

    Space Prison

    Tom Godwin

  • The environment of Ragnarok had struck at the very young with merciless savagery.

    Space Prison

    Tom Godwin


British Dictionary definitions for ragnarok

Ragnarök

Ragnarok

noun
  1. Norse myth the ultimate destruction of the gods in a cataclysmic battle with evil, out of which a new order will ariseGerman equivalent: Götterdämmerung

Word Origin for Ragnarök

Old Norse ragnarökkr, from regin the gods + rökkr twilight
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for ragnarok

Ragnarok

n.

in Norse mythology, the last battle of the world, in which gods and men will be destroyed by monsters and darkness, 1770, from Old Norse ragna, genitive of rögn "gods" + rök "destined end" or rökr "twilight." Cf. Gotterdammerung.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper