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raise

[ reyz ]
/ reɪz /
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See synonyms for: raise / raised / raising on Thesaurus.com

verb (used with object), raised, rais·ing.
verb (used without object), raised, rais·ing.
to be able to be lifted or pulled up: The window raises easily.
(in cards, poker, etc.) to increase a previous bet or bid: My cards weren't good enough to let me raise.
noun
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Idioms about raise

    raise Cain. Cain1 (def. 3).

Origin of raise

First recorded in 1150–1200; Middle English reisen (verb), from Scandinavian (compare Old Norse reisa); compare also Gothic -raisjan (causative verb formed on Germanic base of Old English rīsan “to rise” (see rise), Old English rǣran “to rear up” (see rear2)

synonym study for raise

1, 2. Raise, lift, heave, hoist imply bringing something up above its original position. Raise, the most general word, may mean to bring something to or toward an upright position with one end resting on the ground; or it may be used in the sense of lift, moving an object a comparatively short distance upward but breaking completely its physical contact with the place where it had been: to raise a ladder; to raise ( lift ) a package. Heave implies lifting with effort or exertion: to heave a huge box onto a truck. Hoist implies lifting slowly and gradually something of considerable weight, usually with mechanical help, such as given by a crane or derrick: to hoist steel beams to the top of the framework of a building.

words often confused with raise

Raise and rise are similar in form and meaning but different in grammatical use. Raise is the causative of rise; to raise something is to cause it to rise. Raise is almost always used transitively. Its forms are regular: Raise the window. The flag had been raised before we arrived. Raise in the intransitive sense “to rise up, arise” is nonstandard: Dough raises better when the temperature is warm.
Rise is almost exclusively intransitive in its standard uses. Its forms are irregular: My husband usually rises before seven. The earliest I have ever risen is eight. The sun rose in a cloudless sky. The dough is rising now.
Both raise and rear are used in the United States to refer to the upbringing of children. Although raise was formerly condemned in this sense (“You raise hogs but you rear children”), it is now standard.
In American English, a person receives a raise in salary. In British English it is a rise.

OTHER WORDS FROM raise

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH raise

1. raise , raze2. raise , rise (see usage note at the current entry)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use raise in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for raise

raise
/ (reɪz) /

verb (mainly tr)
noun
the act or an instance of raising
mainly US and Canadian an increase, esp in salary, wages, etc; rise

Derived forms of raise

raisable or raiseable, adjectiveraiser, noun

Word Origin for raise

C12: from Old Norse reisa; related to Old English rǣran to rear ²
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Other Idioms and Phrases with raise

raise

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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