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THINK YOU’VE GOT A HANDLE ON THIS US STATE NICKNAME QUIZ?

Did you ever collect all those state quarters? Put them to good use on this quiz about curious state monikers and the facts around them.
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Mississippi’s nickname comes from the magnificent trees that grow there. What is it?

Idioms for rise

    get a rise out of, Informal.
    1. to provoke, as to action or anger.
    2. to evoke the expected or desired response from.
    give rise to, to originate; produce; cause: The Industrial Revolution gave rise to accelerated urbanization.

Origin of rise

First recorded before 1000; Middle English risen (verb), Old English rīsan; cognate with Dutch rijzen, Old High German rīsan, Gothic reisan; akin to raise, rear2

words often confused with rise

See raise.

OTHER WORDS FROM rise

half-rise, nounre·rise, verb, re·rose, re·ris·en, re·ris·ing.un·ris·en, adjective

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH rise

raise, rise (see confusables note at raise)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

VOCAB BUILDER

What is a basic definition of rise?

Rise means to get up from a low position or to increase. As a noun, rise means an elevation from a starting point. The word rise has many other senses as a verb and a noun. In nearly every sense, the word rise refers to something going up or going upward, either literally or figuratively.

When something or someone rises, it is going from a seated or prone position to an upright, erect position. If a cat rises from the floor, for example, it moves from sitting or laying down on the floor to standing.

  • Real-life examples: At sporting events, people rise out of their chairs during the national anthem. A person rises after doing push-ups or sit-ups. When zombies rise from the dead, they are standing up from a lying position in the dirt or a coffin.
  • Used in a sentence: Jessica quickly rose to her feet after her mom caught her lazing on the couch. 

Rise can also mean to increase, especially something that is measured in numbers, such as prices or temperature.

  • Real-life examples: The temperature rises when it is hot outside. News ratings tend to rise during elections, scandals, or natural disasters. Your cost of living will probably rise dramatically if you decide to move to New York City.
  • Used in a sentence: The cost of my electric bill keeps rising no matter how little power I use.

As a noun, rise means an elevation or increase from a beginning or first appearance.

  • Real-life examples: Asia was changed forever by the rise of the Mongol Empire during the 12th and 13th centuries. The rise of rock and roll music occurred during the 1950s. The rise of the Nazis in the 1930s changed world history.
  • Used in a sentence: In my opinion, music got a lot more interesting after the rise of hip-hop. 

Where does rise come from?

The first records of rise come from before the year 1000. It ultimately comes from the Old English verb rīsan. It is related to similar words with the same meaning, such as the Dutch rijzen and the Old High German rīsan.

Did you know ... ?

What are some other forms related to rise?

  • riser (noun)
  • risen (adjective, past participle)
  • half-rise (noun)
  • rerise (verb)
  • unrisen (adjective)

What are some synonyms for rise?

What are some words that share a root or word element with rise

What are some words that often get used in discussing rise?

What are some words rise may be commonly confused with?

How is rise used in real life?

Rise is a very common word that most often means to get up or to increase.

Try using rise!

Which of the following words is NOT a synonym of rise?

A. ascend
B. move up
C. descend
D. get up

Example sentences from the Web for rise

British Dictionary definitions for rise

rise
/ (raɪz) /

verb rises, rising, rose (rəʊz) or risen (ˈrɪzən) (mainly intr)

noun

Word Origin for rise

Old English rīsan; related to Old Saxon rīsan, Gothic reisan
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with rise

rise

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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