ravening

[ rav-uh-ning ]
/ ˈræv ə nɪŋ /

adjective

rapacious; voracious.

noun

Origin of ravening

First recorded in 1520–30; raven2 + -ing2, -ing1

Related forms

rav·en·ing·ly, adverb

Definition for ravening (2 of 2)

raven

2
[ rav-uh n ]
/ ˈræv ən /

verb (used without object)

verb (used with object)

to seize as spoil or prey.
to devour voraciously.

noun

rapine; robbery.
plunder or prey.
Also ravin.

Origin of raven

2
1485–95; earlier ravine < Middle French raviner, ultimately < Latin rapīna rapine
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for ravening

British Dictionary definitions for ravening (1 of 4)

ravening

/ (ˈrævənɪŋ) /

adjective

(esp of animals such as wolves) voracious; predatory

Derived Forms

raveningly, adverb

British Dictionary definitions for ravening (2 of 4)

Raven

/ (ˈreɪvən) /

noun

a traditional trickster hero among the native peoples of the Canadian Pacific Northwest

Word Origin for Raven

from raven 1

British Dictionary definitions for ravening (3 of 4)

raven

1
/ (ˈreɪvən) /

noun

a large passerine bird, Corvus corax, having a large straight bill, long wedge-shaped tail, and black plumage: family Corvidae (crows). It has a hoarse croaking cry
  1. a shiny black colour
  2. (as adjective)raven hair

Word Origin for raven

Old English hrǣfn; related to Old High German hraban, Old Norse hrafn

British Dictionary definitions for ravening (4 of 4)

raven

2
/ (ˈrævən) /

verb

to seize or seek (plunder, prey, etc)
to eat (something) voraciously or greedily; be ravenous in eating

Derived Forms

ravener, noun

Word Origin for raven

C15: from Old French raviner to attack impetuously; see ravenous
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012