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reactance

[ ree-ak-tuhns ]

noun

  1. Electricity. the opposition of inductance and capacitance to alternating current, expressed in ohms: equal to the product of the sine of the angular phase difference between current and voltage and the ratio of the effective voltage to the effective current. : X Compare capacitive reactance, inductive reactance.
  2. Acoustics. acoustic reactance.


reactance

/ rɪˈæktəns /

noun

  1. the opposition to the flow of alternating current by the capacitance or inductance of an electrical circuit; the imaginary part of the impedance Z , Z = R + i X , where R is the resistance, i = √–1, and X is the reactance. It is expressed in ohms Compare resistance
  2. the opposition to the flow of an acoustic or mechanical vibration, usually due to inertia or stiffness. It is the magnitude of the imaginary part of the acoustic or mechanical impedance


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Word History and Origins

Origin of reactance1

First recorded in 1890–95; react + -ance
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Example Sentences

Such a response, known in psychology as reactance, generally is short-lived.

Find the reactance of a choke coil having a resistance of 10 ohms, when its impedance is 50 ohms.

The essential parts of a Tungar Rectifier are: A bulb, transformer, reactance, and the enclosing case and equipment.

The light obtainable through a reactance is not of the best quality and reactances are not much used.

If a reactance is used in place of a rheostat in an alternating-current circuit, the loss of energy is greatly reduced.

The combined effect of resistance and reactance is called impedance.

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