recorder

[ ri-kawr-der ]
/ rɪˈkɔr dər /

noun

a person who records, especially as an official duty.
English Law.
  1. a judge in a city or borough court.
  2. (formerly) the legal adviser of a city or borough, with responsibility for keeping a record of legal actions and local customs.
a recording or registering apparatus or device.
a device for recording sound, images, or data by electrical, magnetic, or optical means.
an end-blown flute having a fipple mouthpiece, eight finger holes, and a soft, mellow tone.

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Origin of recorder

1275–1325; Middle English recorder wind instrument (see record, -er1), recordour legal official (<Anglo-French recordour,Old French recordeour)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for recorder

British Dictionary definitions for recorder

recorder
/ (rɪˈkɔːdə) /

noun

a person who records, such as an official or historian
something that records, esp an apparatus that provides a permanent record of experiments, etc
short for tape recorder
music a wind instrument of the flute family, blown through a fipple in the mouth end, having a reedlike quality of tone. There are four usual sizes: bass, tenor, treble, and descant
(in England) a barrister or solicitor of at least ten years' standing appointed to sit as a part-time judge in the crown court

Derived forms of recorder

recordership, noun

Word Origin for recorder

sense 4 probably from record (vb) in the archaic sense "to sing"
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Cultural definitions for recorder

recorder

A wooden flute played like a whistle. It was popular in the fourteenth through eighteenth centuries. Interest in it has been revived over the past few decades.

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.