red-blooded

[red-bluhd-id]

adjective

vigorous; virile.

Origin of red-blooded

First recorded in 1795–1805
Related formsred-blood·ed·ness, noun

Synonyms for red-blooded

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for red-blooded

Contemporary Examples of red-blooded

Historical Examples of red-blooded

  • Men like what the magazines call “a red-blooded, two-fisted, he-man.”

  • So this was the man whom Richard Gregory had designated as a red-blooded American.

    El Diablo

    Brayton Norton

  • Young men, red-blooded, far from home, inhabit these war cities.

    Huts in Hell

    Daniel A. Poling

  • One there lacks the freedom of expression which all red-blooded men love.

    Cox--The Man

    Roger W. Babson

  • He is a hearty, red-blooded, Tory gentleman who lives in Worcestershire.


British Dictionary definitions for red-blooded

red-blooded

adjective

informal vigorous; virile
Derived Formsred-bloodedness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for red-blooded
adj.

"having red blood," 1802, from red (adj.1) + blood (n.). Figurative meaning "vigorous, spirited" is recorded from 1877.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper