persuasive

[ per-swey-siv, -ziv ]
/ pərˈsweɪ sɪv, -zɪv /

adjective

able, fitted, or intended to persuade: a very persuasive argument.

noun

something that persuades; inducement.

Nearby words

  1. persuadable,
  2. persuade,
  3. persuader,
  4. persuasible,
  5. persuasion,
  6. persulfate,
  7. persulfuric acid,
  8. persulphuric acid,
  9. pert,
  10. pert.

Origin of persuasive

First recorded in 1580–90, persuasive is from the Medieval Latin word persuāsīvus. See persuasible, -ive

Related forms
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for persuasive


British Dictionary definitions for persuasive

persuasive

/ (pəˈsweɪsɪv) /

adjective

having the power or ability to persuade; tending to persuadea persuasive salesman
Derived Formspersuasively, adverbpersuasiveness, noun

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for persuasive

persuasive

adj.

1580s, from Middle French persuasif, from Medieval Latin persuasivus, from Latin persuas-, past participle stem of persuadere "persuade, convince" (see persuasion). Related: Persuasively; persuasiveness. Replaced earlier persuasible in this sense (see persuadable).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper