redwood

1
[red-woo d]
|

noun

a coniferous tree, Sequoia sempervirens, of California, noted for its great height, sometimes reaching to more than 350 feet (107 meters): the state tree of California.
its valuable brownish-red timber.
a red-colored wood.
any of various trees yielding a reddish wood.
any tree whose wood produces a red dyestuff.

Origin of redwood

1
First recorded in 1610–20; red1 + wood1

redwood

2

or red·wud

[red-woo d]

adjective Scot.

raving mad; insane.
distracted with anger; furious.

Origin of redwood

2
First recorded in 1550–60; red1 + wood2
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for redwood

Contemporary Examples of redwood

Historical Examples of redwood

  • Just then Redwood turned and waved his hand to somebody near us.

    Tom, Dick and Harry

    Talbot Baines Reed

  • And after him Redwood dropped a goal, first from one side line, then from the other.

    Tom, Dick and Harry

    Talbot Baines Reed

  • “We need not discuss this, Redwood,” said Mr Jarman, and walked away.

    Tom, Dick and Harry

    Talbot Baines Reed

  • It was in vain I struggled, and explained that Redwood was waiting for me.

    Tom, Dick and Harry

    Talbot Baines Reed

  • I saw Redwood go to him and say something, pointing as he did so to the hand.

    Tom, Dick and Harry

    Talbot Baines Reed


British Dictionary definitions for redwood

redwood

noun

a giant coniferous tree, Sequoia sempervirens, of coastal regions of California, having reddish fibrous bark and durable timber: family Taxodiaceae . The largest specimen is over 120 metres (360 feet) tallSee also sequoia
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for redwood
n.

1610s, "wood that has a red hue," from red (adj.1) + wood (n.). Of various types of New World trees that yield such wood, from 1716; specifically of the California Sequoia sempervirens from 1819. In Scottish English 16c.-18c. the same word as an adjective meant "completely deranged, raving, stark mad," from wood (adj.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper