rick

1
[ rik ]
/ rɪk /

noun

Also hayrick. Chiefly Midland U.S. a large, usually rectangular stack or pile of hay, straw, corn, or the like, in a field, especially when thatched or covered by a tarpaulin; an outdoor or makeshift mow.
a stack of cordwood or logs cut to even lengths.
a frame of horizontal bars and vertical supports, as used to hold barrels in a distillery, boxes in a warehouse, etc.

verb (used with object)

to form grain into a stack or pile.
to stack (cordwood) in ricks.

Nearby words

  1. ricin,
  2. ricinoleic,
  3. ricinoleic acid,
  4. ricinolein,
  5. ricinus oil,
  6. rickenbacker,
  7. rickenbacker, edward vernon,
  8. ricker,
  9. rickets,
  10. ricketts

Origin of rick

1
before 900; Middle English rek(e), reek, Old English hrēac; akin to Old Norse hraukr, Old Frisian reak, Middle Dutch rooc, roke

Related formsrick·er, noun

rick

2
[ rik ]
/ rɪk /

verb (used with or without object), noun

Rick

[ rik ]
/ rɪk /

noun

a male given name, form of Eric or Richard.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for rick


British Dictionary definitions for rick

rick

1
/ (rɪk) /

noun

a large stack of hay, corn, peas, etc, built in the open in a regular-shaped pile, esp one with a thatched top

verb

(tr) to stack or pile into ricks

Word Origin for rick

Old English hrēac; related to Old Norse hraukr

noun

a wrench or sprain, as of the back

verb

(tr) to wrench or sprain (a joint, a limb, the back, etc)

Word Origin for rick

C18: see wrick

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for rick

rick

n.

Old English hreac "stack of hay or straw," from Proto-Germanic *khraukaz (cf. Old Norse hraukr, Frisian reak, Dutch rook "heap"); perhaps related to ridge.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper