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row

1
[ roh ]
/ roʊ /
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See synonyms for: row / rowed / rowing on Thesaurus.com

noun
verb (used with object)
to put in a row (often followed by up).
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Idioms about row

    hard / long row to hoe, a difficult task or set of circumstances to confront: At 32 and with two children, she found attending medical school a hard row to hoe.

Origin of row

1
First recorded in 1200–50; Middle English reue, reuwe, rou(e) “row, line, rank (line of soldiers),” Old English rǣw, rāw; akin to Middle Dutch rije, Middle High German rīhe, German Reihe “row”

Other definitions for row (2 of 3)

row2
[ roh ]
/ roʊ /

verb (used without object)
to propel a vessel by the leverage of an oar or the like.
verb (used with object)
noun
an act, instance, or period of rowing: It was a long row to the far bank.
an excursion in a rowboat: to go for a row.

Origin of row

2
First recorded before 950; Middle English rouen, rouwen, Old English rōwan “to go by water, sail, row”; cognate with Old Norse rōa; akin to Latin rēmus, Greek eretmón, both meaning “oar”; see also rudder

OTHER WORDS FROM row

row·a·ble, adjectiverower, nounun·der·row·er, noun

Other definitions for row (3 of 3)

row3
[ rou ]
/ raʊ /

noun
a noisy dispute or quarrel; commotion.
noise or clamor.
verb (used without object)
to quarrel noisily.
verb (used with object)
Chiefly British. to upbraid severely; scold.

Origin of row

3
First recorded in 1740–50; origin uncertain
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use row in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for row (1 of 3)

row1
/ (rəʊ) /

noun

Word Origin for row

Old English rāw, rǣw; related to Old High German rīga line, Lithuanian raiwe strip

British Dictionary definitions for row (2 of 3)

row2
/ (raʊ) /

noun
a noisy quarrel or dispute
a noisy disturbance; commotionwe couldn't hear the music for the row next door
a reprimand
give someone a row informal to scold someone; tell someone off
verb
(intr often foll by with) to quarrel noisily
(tr) archaic to reprimand

Word Origin for row

C18: origin unknown

British Dictionary definitions for row (3 of 3)

row3
/ (rəʊ) /

verb
noun
an act, instance, period, or distance of rowing
an excursion in a rowing boat
See also row over

Derived forms of row

rower, nounrowing, noun

Word Origin for row

Old English rōwan; related to Middle Dutch roien, Middle High German rüejen, Old Norse rōa, Latin rēmus oar
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Other Idioms and Phrases with row

row

see get one's ducks in a row; kick up a fuss (row); skid row; tough row to hoe.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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