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sage

1
[ seyj ]
/ seɪdʒ /
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noun
a profoundly wise person; a person famed for wisdom.
someone venerated for the possession of wisdom, judgment, and experience.
adjective, sag·er, sag·est.
wise, judicious, or prudent: sage advice.
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Origin of sage

1
First recorded in 1250–1300; Middle English, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin sapius (unattested), from Latin sap(ere) “to taste, have taste, smell, smell of; to have sense, discern, know, be wise” + -idus; see origin at sapient, -id4

OTHER WORDS FROM sage

sage·ly, adverb, adjectivesage·ness, noun

Other definitions for sage (2 of 3)

sage2
[ seyj ]
/ seɪdʒ /

noun
any plant or shrub belonging to the genus Salvia, of the mint family.
an herb, Salvia officinalis, whose grayish-green leaves are used in medicine and for seasoning in cookery.
the leaves themselves.

Origin of sage

2
1275–1325; Middle English sa(u)ge<Middle French sau(l)ge<Latin salvia, derivative of salvussafe (so named from its supposed healing powers)

Other definitions for sage (3 of 3)

Sage
[ seyj ]
/ seɪdʒ /

noun
Russell, 1816–1906, U.S. financier.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use sage in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for sage (1 of 2)

sage1
/ (seɪdʒ) /

noun
a man revered for his profound wisdom
adjective
profoundly wise or prudent
obsolete solemn

Derived forms of sage

sagely, adverbsageness, noun

Word Origin for sage

C13: from Old French, from Latin sapere to be sensible; see sapient

British Dictionary definitions for sage (2 of 2)

sage2
/ (seɪdʒ) /

noun
a perennial Mediterranean plant, Salvia officinalis, having grey-green leaves and purple, blue, or white flowers: family Lamiaceae (labiates)
the leaves of this plant, used in cooking for flavouring
short for sagebrush

Word Origin for sage

C14: from Old French saulge, from Latin salvia, from salvus safe, in good health (from the curative properties attributed to the plant)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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