savage

[ sav-ij ]
/ ˈsæv ɪdʒ /

adjective

noun

verb (used with object), sav·aged, sav·ag·ing.

to assault and maul by biting, rending, goring, etc.; tear at or mutilate: numerous sheep savaged by dogs.
to attack or criticize thoroughly or remorselessly; excoriate: a play savaged by the critics.

Origin of savage

1250–1300; Middle English savage, sauvage (adj.) < Middle French sauvage, salvage < Medieval Latin salvāticus, for Latin silvāticus, equivalent to silv(a) woods + -āticus adj. suffix
Related forms

Synonym study

1. See cruel.

Definition for savage (2 of 2)

Savage

[ sav-ij ]
/ ˈsæv ɪdʒ /

noun

Michael Joseph,1872–1940, New Zealand statesman and labor leader: prime minister 1935–40.
Richard,1697?–1743, English poet.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for savage

British Dictionary definitions for savage (1 of 2)

savage

/ (ˈsævɪdʒ) /

adjective

noun

verb (tr)

to criticize violently
to attack ferociously and woundthe dog savaged the child
Derived Formssavagedom, nounsavagely, adverbsavageness, noun

Word Origin for savage

C13: from Old French sauvage, from Latin silvāticus belonging to a wood, from silva a wood

British Dictionary definitions for savage (2 of 2)

Savage

/ (ˈsævɪdʒ) /

noun

Michael Joseph. 1872-1940, New Zealand statesman; prime minister of New Zealand (1935-40)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012