savage

[ sav-ij ]
/ ˈsæv ɪdʒ /

adjective

noun

verb (used with object), sav·aged, sav·ag·ing.

to assault and maul by biting, rending, goring, etc.; tear at or mutilate: numerous sheep savaged by dogs.
to attack or criticize thoroughly or remorselessly; excoriate: a play savaged by the critics.

Nearby words

  1. sauve qui peut,
  2. sauvignon,
  3. sauvignon blanc,
  4. sav,
  5. sava,
  6. savage's station,
  7. savage, richard,
  8. savagely,
  9. savagery,
  10. savagism

Origin of savage

1250–1300; Middle English savage, sauvage (adj.) < Middle French sauvage, salvage < Medieval Latin salvāticus, for Latin silvāticus, equivalent to silv(a) woods + -āticus adj. suffix

Related forms

Synonym study

1. See cruel.

Savage

[ sav-ij ]
/ ˈsæv ɪdʒ /

noun

Michael Joseph,1872–1940, New Zealand statesman and labor leader: prime minister 1935–40.
Richard,1697?–1743, English poet.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for savage


British Dictionary definitions for savage

savage

/ (ˈsævɪdʒ) /

adjective

noun

verb (tr)

to criticize violently
to attack ferociously and woundthe dog savaged the child
Derived Formssavagedom, nounsavagely, adverbsavageness, noun

Word Origin for savage

C13: from Old French sauvage, from Latin silvāticus belonging to a wood, from silva a wood

Savage

/ (ˈsævɪdʒ) /

noun

Michael Joseph. 1872-1940, New Zealand statesman; prime minister of New Zealand (1935-40)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for savage
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper