saying

[ sey-ing ]
/ ˈseɪ ɪŋ /

noun

something said, especially a proverb or apothegm.

Idioms for saying

    go without saying, to be completely self-evident; be understood: It goes without saying that you are welcome to visit us at any time.

Origin of saying

1250–1300; Middle English (gerund); see say1, -ing1

Definition for saying (2 of 3)

Origin of say

1
before 900; Middle English seyen, seggen, Old English secgan; cognate with Dutch zeggen, German sagen, Old Norse segja; akin to saw3

OTHER WORDS FROM say

say·er, noun

Definition for saying (3 of 3)

say2
[ sey ]
/ seɪ /

verb (used with object), noun British Dialect.

Origin of say

2
1350–1400; Middle English sayen, aphetic variant of assayen to assay
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Examples from the Web for saying

British Dictionary definitions for saying (1 of 3)

saying
/ (ˈseɪɪŋ) /

noun

a maxim, adage, or proverb

British Dictionary definitions for saying (2 of 3)

Derived forms of say

sayer, noun

Word Origin for say

Old English secgan; related to Old Norse segja, Old Saxon seggian, Old High German sagēn

British Dictionary definitions for saying (3 of 3)

say2
/ (seɪ) /

noun

archaic a type of fine woollen fabric

Word Origin for say

C13: from Old French saie, from Latin saga, plural of sagum a type of woollen cloak
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with saying

say

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.