scallion

[ skal-yuhn ]
/ ˈskæl yən /

noun

any onion that does not form a large bulb; green onion.
a shallot.
a leek.

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Origin of scallion

1300–50; late Middle English scalyon(e) <Old French *escaloigne<Vulgar Latin *escalonia, variant of Latin Ascalōnia (caepa) onion of Ascalon, a seaport of Palestine; replacing Middle English scalone, scaloun<Anglo-French scaloun<Vulgar Latin, as above
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Example sentences from the Web for scallion

  • In large salad bowl, combine greens, scallion, and radish; dress with remaining vinaigrette and season with salt and pepper, toss.

    Fresh Picks|Alfred Portale|August 31, 2011|DAILY BEAST

British Dictionary definitions for scallion

scallion
/ (ˈskæljən) /

noun

any of various onions or similar plants, such as the spring onion, that have a small bulb and long leaves and are eaten in saladsAlso called: green onion

Word Origin for scallion

C14: from Anglo-French scalun, from Latin Ascalōnia (caepa) Ascalonian (onion), from Ascalo Ascalon, a Palestinian port
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012