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scantling

[ skant-ling ]
/ ˈskænt lɪŋ /
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noun

a timber of relatively slight width and thickness, as a stud or rafter in a house frame.
such timbers collectively.
the width and thickness of a timber.
the dimensions of a building stone.
Nautical.
  1. a dressed timber or rolled metal member used as a framing member in a vessel.
  2. the dimension, in cross section, of a framing member.
a small quantity or amount.

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Origin of scantling

1520–30; scant + -ling1; replacing Middle English scantilon<Old French escantillon gauge
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use scantling in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for scantling

scantling
/ (ˈskæntlɪŋ) /

noun

a piece of sawn timber, such as a rafter, that has a small cross section
the dimensions of a piece of building material or the structural parts of a ship, esp those in cross section
a building stone, esp one that is more than 6 feet in length
a small quantity or amount

Word Origin for scantling

C16: changed (through influence of scant and -ling 1) from earlier scantillon, a carpenter's gauge, from Old Norman French escantillon, ultimately from Latin scandere to climb; see scan
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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