Origin of second

1
1250–1300; Middle English (adj., noun and adv.) < Old French (adj.) < Latin secundus following, next, second, equivalent to sec- (base of sequī to follow) + -undus adj. suffix
Related formssec·ond·er, noun

Definition for second (2 of 3)

second

2
[ sek-uhnd ]
/ ˈsɛk ənd /

noun

the sixtieth part of a minute of time.
a moment or instant: It takes only a second to phone.
the basic unit of time in the International System of Units(SI), equal to the duration of 9,192,631,770 cycles of radiation in a transition, or energy level change, of the cesium atom. Symbol: s, S; Abbreviation: sec
Geometry, Astronomy. the sixtieth part of a minute of angular measure, often represented by the sign ″, as in 30″, which is read as 30 seconds.Compare angle1(def 1c).

Origin of second

2
1350–1400; Middle English seconde < Middle French < Medieval Latin secunda (minūta) second (minute), feminine of secundus second1

Definition for second (3 of 3)

second

3
[ si-kond ]
/ sɪˈkɒnd /

verb (used with object)

British. to transfer (an officer, official, or the like) temporarily to another post.

Origin of second

3
1795–1805; < French second, noun use of the adj. in the phrase en second, as in lieutenant en second second lieutenant; see second1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for second

British Dictionary definitions for second (1 of 3)

Derived Formsseconder, noun

Word Origin for second

C13: via Old French from Latin secundus coming next in order, from sequī to follow

British Dictionary definitions for second (2 of 3)

second

2
/ (ˈsɛkənd) /

noun

  1. 1/60 of a minute of time
  2. the basic SI unit of time: the duration of 9 192 631 770 periods of radiation corresponding to the transition between two hyperfine levels of the ground state of caesium-133Symbol: s
1/60 of a minute of angleSymbol:
a very short period of time; moment

Word Origin for second

C14: from Old French, from Medieval Latin pars minūta secunda the second small part (a minute being the first small part of an hour); see second 1

British Dictionary definitions for second (3 of 3)

second

3
/ (sɪˈkɒnd) /

verb (tr) British

to transfer (an employee) temporarily to another branch, etc
military to transfer (an officer) to another post, often retiring him to a staff or nonregimental position

Word Origin for second

C19: from French en second in second rank (or position)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medicine definitions for second

second

[ sĕkənd ]

adj.

Coming next after the first in order, place, rank, time, or quality.
Being the next closest to the innermost digit, especially on the foot.
Related formssecond n.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Science definitions for second

second

[ sĕkənd ]

A unit of time equal to 160 of a minute.♦ A sidereal second is 160 of a sidereal minute, and a mean solar second is 160 of a mean solar minute. See more at sidereal time solar time.
A unit of angular measurement, such as longitude or right ascension, equal to 160 of a minute of arc.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Idioms and Phrases with second

second


In addition to the idioms beginning with second

  • second banana
  • second best
  • second childhood
  • second class
  • second cousin
  • second fiddle
  • second hand
  • second nature
  • second sight
  • second thoughts
  • second to none
  • second wind

also see:

  • at second hand
  • come off (second best)
  • in a flash (second)
  • in the first (second) place
  • on second thought
  • play second fiddle
  • split second
  • top (second) banana
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.