see

1
[ see ]
/ si /

verb (used with object), saw, seen, see·ing.

verb (used without object), saw, seen, see·ing.

Verb Phrases

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Origin of see

1
before 900; Middle English seen, Old English sēon; cognate with Dutch zien, German sehen, Old Norse sjā, Gothic saihwan

SYNONYMS FOR see

5 comprehend, penetrate.
10 determine.
11 know, undergo.
18 accompany.

OTHER WORDS FROM see

see·a·ble, adjectivesee·a·ble·ness, nounun·see·a·ble, adjective

Definition for see (2 of 2)

see2
[ see ]
/ si /

noun Ecclesiastical.

the seat, center of authority, office, or jurisdiction of a bishop.

Origin of see

2
1250–1300; Middle English se(e) < Old French se (variant of sie) < Latin sēdes seat
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for see

British Dictionary definitions for see (1 of 2)

see1
/ (siː) /

verb sees, seeing, saw or seen

Derived forms of see

seeable, adjective

Word Origin for see

Old English sēon; related to Old Norse sjā, Gothic saihwan, Old Saxon sehan

British Dictionary definitions for see (2 of 2)

see2
/ (siː) /

noun

the diocese of a bishop, or the place within it where his cathedral or procathedral is situatedSee also Holy See

Word Origin for see

C13: from Old French sed, from Latin sēdēs a seat; related to sedēre to sit
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with see

see

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.