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self-pollination

[ self-pol-uh-ney-shuhn, self- ]
/ ˈsɛlfˌpɒl əˈneɪ ʃən, ˌsɛlf- /
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noun Botany.
the transfer of pollen from the anther to the stigma of the same flower, another flower on the same plant, or the flower of a plant of the same clone.

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Origin of self-pollination

First recorded in 1875–80
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use self-pollination in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for self-pollination

self-pollination

noun
the transfer of pollen from the anthers to the stigma of the same flower or of another flower on the same plantCompare cross-pollination

Derived forms of self-pollination

self-pollinated, adjective
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Scientific definitions for self-pollination

self-pollination
[ sĕlf′pŏl′ə-nāshən ]

The transfer of pollen from a male reproductive structure (an anther or male cone) to a female reproductive structure (a stigma or female cone) of the same plant or of the same flower. Self-pollination tends to decrease the genetic diversity (increase the number of homozygous individuals) in a population, and is much less common than cross-fertilization. Many species of plants have evolved mechanisms to promote cross-pollination and avoid self-pollination, though certain plants, such as the pea, regularly self-pollinate. Compare cross-pollination.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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