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sestina

[ se-stee-nuh ]
/ sɛˈsti nə /
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noun, plural ses·ti·nas, ses·ti·ne [se-stee-ney]. /sɛˈsti neɪ/. Prosody.
a poem of six six-line stanzas and a three-line envoy, originally without rhyme, in which each stanza repeats the end words of the lines of the first stanza, but in different order, the envoy using the six words again, three in the middle of the lines and three at the end.
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Also called sextain.

Origin of sestina

1580–90; <Italian, equivalent to sest(o) (<Latin sextussixth) + -ina-ine2
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use sestina in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for sestina

sestina
/ (sɛˈstiːnə) /

noun
an elaborate verse form of Italian origin, normally unrhymed, consisting of six stanzas of six lines each and a concluding tercet. The six final words of the lines in the first stanza are repeated in a different order in each of the remaining five stanzas and also in the concluding tercetAlso called: sextain

Word Origin for sestina

C19: from Italian, from sesto sixth, from Latin sextus
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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