poetry

[ poh-i-tree ]
/ ˈpoʊ ɪ tri /

noun

the art of rhythmical composition, written or spoken, for exciting pleasure by beautiful, imaginative, or elevated thoughts.
literary work in metrical form; verse.
prose with poetic qualities.
poetic qualities however manifested: the poetry of simple acts and things.
poetic spirit or feeling: The pianist played the prelude with poetry.
something suggestive of or likened to poetry: the pure poetry of a beautiful view on a clear day.

Nearby words

  1. poetical,
  2. poeticism,
  3. poeticize,
  4. poetics,
  5. poetize,
  6. poets are born, not made,
  7. pog,
  8. pogamoggan,
  9. pogany,
  10. pogey

Origin of poetry

1350–1400; Middle English poetrie < Medieval Latin poētria poetic art, derivative of poēta poet, but formation is unclear; probably not < Greek poiḗtria poetess

SYNONYMS FOR poetry
2. Poetry, verse agree in referring to the work of a poet. The difference between poetry and verse is usually the difference between substance and form. Poetry is lofty thought or impassioned feeling expressed in imaginative words: Elizabethan poetry. Verse is any expression in words which simply conforms to accepted metrical rules and structure: the differences between prose and verse.

Related formspo·et·ry·less, adjective

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for poetry


British Dictionary definitions for poetry

poetry

/ (ˈpəʊɪtrɪ) /

noun

literature in metrical form; verse
the art or craft of writing verse
poetic qualities, spirit, or feeling in anything
anything resembling poetry in rhythm, beauty, etc

Word Origin for poetry

C14: from Medieval Latin poētria, from Latin poēta poet

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for poetry

poetry

n.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper