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soke

[sohk]
noun Early English Law.
  1. the privilege of holding court, usually connected with the feudal rights of lordship.
  2. a district over which local jurisdiction was exercised.
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Origin of soke

1250–1300; Middle English < Anglo-Latin soca < Old English sōcn attack, right of prosecution, jurisdiction (see soken); akin to sake1, seek
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for soke

Historical Examples

  • The soke and ward of Aldgate was then bounded as I have before showed.

    The Survey of London

    John Stow

  • If so, then there may have been a time when commendation and soke were all one.

    Domesday Book and Beyond

    Frederic William Maitland

  • The soke in the hundred courts belongs to the king and the earl.

    Domesday Book and Beyond

    Frederic William Maitland

  • His predecessor had only the commendation of this, and Harold had the soke.

    Domesday Book and Beyond

    Frederic William Maitland

  • Over this man the Saint has sake and soke and commendation with all custom.

    Domesday Book and Beyond

    Frederic William Maitland


British Dictionary definitions for soke

soke

noun English legal history
  1. the right to hold a local court
  2. the territory under the jurisdiction of a particular court
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Word Origin

C14: from Medieval Latin sōca, from Old English sōcn a seeking; see seek
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for soke

n.

"right of jurisdiction," Old English socn "jurisdiction, prosecution," literally "seeking," from Proto-Germanic *sokniz, from PIE *sag-ni-, from root *sag- "to seek out" (see seek). Related: Sokeman; sokemanry.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper