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RELATED WORDS

perch, crouch, hunch, sit, cower, stoop, heavy, thick, fat, broad, splay, settle, bow, roost, chunky, dumpy, heavyset, thickset

Nearby words

squash vine borer, squash-blossom, squashable, squashy, squassation, squat, squat thrust, squatter, squatter sovereignty, squatter's right, squattocracy

Origin of squat

1250–1300; (v.) Middle English squatten < Old French esquater, esquatir, equivalent to es- ex-1 + quatir < Vulgar Latin *coactīre to compress, equivalent to Latin coāct(us), past participle of cōgere to compress (co- co- + ag(ere) to drive + -tus past participle suffix) + -īre infinitive suffix; (noun) Middle English, derivative of the v.; (adj.) Middle English: in a squatting position, orig., past participle of the v.
SYNONYMS FOR squat
Related formssquat·ly, adverbsquat·ness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for squat

British Dictionary definitions for squat

squat

/ (skwɒt) /

verb squats, squatting or squatted (intr)

adjective

Also: squatty (ˈskwɒtɪ) short and broada squat chair

noun

Derived Formssquatly, adverbsquatness, noun

Word Origin for squat

C13: from Old French esquater, from es- ex- 1 + catir to press together, from Vulgar Latin coactīre (unattested), from Latin cōgere to compress, from co- + agere to drive
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for squat

squat


v.

early 15c., "crouch on the heels," from Old French esquatir "press down, lay flat, crush," from es- "out" (from Latin ex-) + Old French quatir "press down, flatten," from Vulgar Latin *coactire "press together, force," from Latin coactus, past participle of cogere "to compel, curdle, collect" (see cogent). Related: Squatted; squatting. Slang noun sense of "nothing at all" first attested 1934, probably suggestive of squatting to defecate. The adjective sense of "short, thick" dates from 1620s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper