stabilizer

[stey-buh-lahy-zer]

noun


Origin of stabilizer

First recorded in 1905–10; stabilize + -er1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for stabilizer

Contemporary Examples of stabilizer

Historical Examples of stabilizer

  • In practice the stabilizer is often set at no angle of incidence.

  • I rolled the stabilizer, and that enabled me to pull the nose up.

    Test Pilot

    David Goodger (goodger@python.org)

  • Centralite: not an explosive but a stabilizer and regulator.

  • She's a bit out of control, but the stabilizer will keep her on a level keel.

  • Another cut a main spar on one of my wings, and another hit my stabilizer, tearing it half in two.

    America's War for Humanity

    Thomas Herbert Russell



British Dictionary definitions for stabilizer

stabilizer

stabiliser

noun

any device for stabilizing an aircraftSee also horizontal stabilizer, vertical stabilizer
a substance added to something to maintain it in a stable or unchanging state, such as an additive to food to preserve its texture during distribution and storage
nautical
  1. a system of one or more pairs of fins projecting from the hull of a ship and controllable to counteract roll
  2. See gyrostabilizer
either of a pair of brackets supporting a small wheel that can be fitted to the back wheel of a bicycle to help an inexperienced cyclist to maintain balance
an electronic device for producing a direct current supply of constant voltage
economics a measure, such as progressive taxation, interest-rate control, or unemployment benefit, used to restrict swings in prices, employment, production, etc, in a free economy
a person or thing that stabilizes
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for stabilizer
n.

1909 in aeronautical sense, agent noun from stabilize (v.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper