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View synonyms for stark

stark

1

[ stahrk ]

adjective

, stark·er, stark·est.
  1. sheer, utter, downright, or complete:

    This plan is stark madness!

  2. harsh, grim, or desolate, as a view, place, etc.:

    Her photos capture the stark desert landscape.

  3. extremely simple or severe:

    With its stark interior and rough ride, the car scores low in our luxury car ranking.

  4. bluntly or sternly plain; not softened or glamorized:

    He panicked suddenly at the stark reality of the approaching deadline.

  5. distinct, sharp, or vivid:

    The thriving community gardens stood in stark contrast to vacant land and abandoned buildings.

  6. stiff or rigid in substance, muscles, etc.
  7. rigid in death.
  8. Archaic. strong; powerful; massive or robust.


adverb

  1. utterly, absolutely, or quite:

    stark mad.

  2. Chiefly Scot. and North England. in a stark manner; stoutly or vigorously.

Stark

2

[ stahrk; German shtahrk ]

noun

  1. Harold Rayns·ford [reynz, -ferd], 1880–1972, U.S. admiral.
  2. Jo·han·nes [yoh-, hah, -n, uh, s], 1874–1957, German physicist: Nobel Prize 1919.
  3. John, 1728–1822, American Revolutionary War general.

stark

1

/ stɑːk /

adjective

  1. usually prenominal devoid of any elaboration; blunt

    the stark facts

  2. grim; desolate

    a stark landscape

  3. usually prenominal utter; absolute

    stark folly

  4. archaic.
    severe; violent
  5. archaic.
    rigid, as in death (esp in the phrases stiff and stark, stark dead )
  6. short for stark-naked


adverb

  1. completely

    stark mad

Stark

2

noun

  1. stɑːk StarkFreya (Madeline), Dame18931993FBritishTRAVEL AND EXPLORATION: travellerWRITING: writer Dame Freya ( Madeline ) (ˈfreɪə). 1893–1993, British traveller and writer, whose many books include The Southern Gates of Arabia (1936), Beyond Euphrates (1951), and The Journey's Echo (1963)
  2. ʃtark StarkJohannes18741957MGermanSCIENCE: physicist Johannes (joˈhanəs). 1874–1957, German physicist, who discovered the splitting of the lines of a spectrum when the source of light is subjected to a strong electrostatic field ( Stark effect , 1913): Nobel prize for physics 1919

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Derived Forms

  • ˈstarkness, noun
  • ˈstarkly, adverb

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Other Words From

  • stark·ly adverb
  • stark·ness noun

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Word History and Origins

Origin of stark1

First recorded before 900; (adjective) Middle English; Old English stearc “stiff, firm”; cognate with German stark “strong”; akin to Old Norse sterkr “strong”; akin to starch, stare; (adverb) Middle English sterke, derivative of the adjective

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Word History and Origins

Origin of stark1

Old English stearc stiff; related to Old Norse sterkr , Gothic gastaurknan to stiffen

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Synonym Study

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Example Sentences

As such, the stark reality for early-stage startups is they may yet be caught in the cross-hairs of tough macroeconomic headwinds that are forcing even far more established startups to layoff staff and cut down costs.

From Quartz

This hopeful message stood in stark contrast to his tough, no-nonsense, frontal attack on the president.

My guess is that while we wait for a vaccine or treatment, the international contrasts will only grow more stark.

The city conducted a survey to get a better sense of who’s offering the advice and found a stark demographic disparity.

In stark contrast to the rest of the US, where the number of positive coronavirus cases are spiking, reports indicate that New York is effectively containing the coronavirus, at least for the time being.

From Quartz

His constant worship of his wife stands in stark contrast to scandals of the domestic nature in other sports.

These images, videos and messages became a lifeline between two worlds and a stark record of the distance between them.

The fun of the episode, however, stands in stark contrast to its conclusion.

With some areas, the differences are stark in terms of where this windfall lands.

A recent Pew Poll graphically likewise portrays the stark national divide, and the granular differences are gaping.

Charred beams and blackened walls showed stark and gaunt in the glow of a smoldering mass of wreckage.

John Stark, a major general in the revolutionary army, died, aged 93.

You must pull yourself together or you'll go stark mad, and then you'll probably go and throw yourself over the Embankment.

Their own mothers would hardly know them—burnt black with the sun, in rags or else stark naked, with pipes in their mouths.

They stripped us stark naked, and the files were found in the bands of our trowsers through which the string that ties them runs.

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