steadfast

or sted·fast

[ sted-fast, -fahst, -fuhst ]
/ ˈstɛdˌfæst, -ˌfɑst, -fəst /

adjective

fixed in direction; steadily directed: a steadfast gaze.
firm in purpose, resolution, faith, attachment, etc., as a person: a steadfast friend.
unwavering, as resolution, faith, adherence, etc.
firmly established, as an institution or a state of affairs.
firmly fixed in place or position.

Origin of steadfast

before 1000; Middle English stedefast, Old English stedefæst. See stead, fast1

SYNONYMS FOR steadfast

2 sure, dependable, reliable, constant, unwavering. Steadfast, staunch, steady imply a sureness and continuousness that may be depended upon. Steadfast literally means fixed in place, but is chiefly used figuratively to indicate undeviating constancy or resolution: steadfast in one's faith. Staunch literally means watertight, as of a vessel, and therefore strong and firm; figuratively, it is used of loyal support that will endure strain: a staunch advocate of free trade. Literally, steady is applied to that which is relatively firm in position or continuous in movement or duration: a steady flow; figuratively, it implies sober regularity or persistence: a steady worker.
4, 5 stable.

Related forms

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for steadfastly

British Dictionary definitions for steadfastly

steadfast

stedfast

/ (ˈstɛdfəst, -ˌfɑːst) /

adjective

(esp of a person's gaze) fixed in intensity or direction; steady
unwavering or determined in purpose, loyalty, etcsteadfast resolve

Derived Forms

steadfastly or stedfastly, adverbsteadfastness or stedfastness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012