steamer

[ stee-mer ]
/ ˈsti mər /

noun

something propelled or operated by steam, as a steamship.
a person or thing that steams.
a device, pot, or container in which something is steamed.

verb (used without object)

to travel by steamship.

QUIZZES

HEED THE VOX POPULI, AND TAKE THIS WORD OF THE DAY QUIZ!

Test your memory on these verbal firecrackers from the week of June 29 to July 5!
Question 1 of 7
anchorite

Origin of steamer

First recorded in 1805–15; steam + -er1

Definition for steamer (2 of 2)

Origin of steam

before 1000; Middle English steme, Old English stēam; cognate with Dutch stoom

OTHER WORDS FROM steam

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for steamer

British Dictionary definitions for steamer (1 of 2)

steamer
/ (ˈstiːmə) /

noun

a boat or ship driven by steam engines
Also called: steam box an apparatus for steaming wooden beams and planks to make them pliable for shipbuilding
a vessel used to cook food by steam
Australian slang a clash of sporting teams characterized by rough play

British Dictionary definitions for steamer (2 of 2)

steam
/ (stiːm) /

noun

verb

See also steam up

Word Origin for steam

Old English; related to Dutch stoom steam, perhaps to Old High German stioban to raise dust, Gothic stubjus dust
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Scientific definitions for steamer

steam
[ stēm ]

Water in its gaseous state, especially at a temperature above the boiling point of water (above 100°C, or 212°F, at sea level). See Note at vapor.
A mist of condensed water vapor.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Idioms and Phrases with steamer

steam

see blow off steam; full speed (steam) ahead; get up steam; run out of steam; under one's own steam.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.