stout

[ stout ]
/ staʊt /

adjective, stout·er, stout·est.

noun

Origin of stout

1250–1300; Middle English (adj.) < Old French estout bold, proud < Germanic; compare Middle Dutch stout bold, Middle Low German stolt, Middle High German stolz proud

Related forms

Synonym study

Stout, fat, plump imply corpulence of body. Stout describes a heavily built but usually strong and healthy body: a handsome stout lady. Fat, an informal word with unpleasant connotations, suggests an unbecoming fleshy stoutness; it may, however, apply also to a hearty fun-loving type of stout person: a fat old man; fat and jolly. Plump connotes a pleasing roundness and is often used as a complimentary or euphemistic equivalent for stout, fleshy, etc.: a pleasingly plump figure attractively dressed.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for stouter

British Dictionary definitions for stouter (1 of 2)

stout

/ (staʊt) /

adjective

solidly built or corpulent
(prenominal) resolute or valiantstout fellow
strong, substantial, and robust
a stout heart courage; resolution

noun

strong porter highly flavoured with malt

Derived Forms

stoutish, adjectivestoutly, adverbstoutness, noun

Word Origin for stout

C14: from Old French estout bold, of Germanic origin; related to Middle High German stolz proud, Middle Dutch stolt brave

British Dictionary definitions for stouter (2 of 2)

Stout

/ (staʊt) /

noun

Sir Robert. 1844–1930, New Zealand statesman, born in Scotland: prime minister of New Zealand (1884–87)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012