studio

[stoo-dee-oh, styoo-]

noun, plural stu·di·os.

the workroom or atelier of an artist, as a painter or sculptor.
a room or place for instruction or experimentation in one of the performing arts: a dance studio.
a room or set of rooms specially equipped for broadcasting radio or television programs, making phonograph records, filming motion pictures, etc.
all the buildings and adjacent land required or used by a company engaged in the production of motion pictures.

Origin of studio

1800–10; 1910–15 for def 4; < Italian < Latin studium; see study
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for studio

Contemporary Examples of studio

Historical Examples of studio

  • My home life—if existence in a studio can be so called—was merry.

  • Sam went up three steps at a time and burst into Jack's studio.

    The Underdog

    F. Hopkinson Smith

  • For a long time it was his studio and kitchen, his laboratory and bedroom.

  • Arriving in Boston on October 18, he lost no time in renting a studio.

  • You can excuse the disorder and discomfort of a painter's studio?'

    Little Dorrit

    Charles Dickens


British Dictionary definitions for studio

studio

noun plural -dios

a room in which an artist, photographer, or musician works
a room used to record television or radio programmes, make films, etc
(plural) the premises of a radio, television, or film company

Word Origin for studio

C19: from Italian, literally: study, from Latin studium diligence
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for studio
n.

1819, "work-room of a sculptor or painter," from Italian studio "room for study," from Latin studium (see study). Motion picture sense first recorded 1911; radio broadcasting sense 1922; television sense 1938. Studio apartment first recorded 1903.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper