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systole

[ sis-tuh-lee, -lee ]

noun

  1. Physiology. the normal rhythmical contraction of the heart, during which the blood in the chambers is forced onward. Compare diastole.
  2. Classical Prosody. the shortening of a syllable regularly long.


systole

/ sɪˈstɒlɪk; ˈsɪstəlɪ /

noun

  1. contraction of the heart, during which blood is pumped into the aorta and the arteries that lead to the lungs Compare diastole


systole

/ sĭstə-lē /

  1. The period during the normal beating of the heart in which the chambers of the heart, especially the ventricles, contract to force blood into the aorta and pulmonary artery.
  2. Compare diastole


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Derived Forms

  • systolic, adjective

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Other Words From

  • pre·systo·le noun

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Word History and Origins

Origin of systole1

1570–80; < Greek systolḗ a drawing up, contraction, equivalent to sy- sy- + stolḗ pressure, originally, garment, equipment, equivalent to stol- (noun derivative of stéllein to send, place) + feminine noun suffix; diastole, systaltic

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Word History and Origins

Origin of systole1

C16: via Late Latin from Greek sustolē, from sustellein to contract; see systaltic

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Example Sentences

Further work traced this effect to the fact that during systole, pressure sensors send signals about the heart’s activity to inhibitory regions of the brain.

The ding of her husband's cash register and the click of her dangle bag mark the systole and diastole of married life.

Systole and diastole, the contraction and dilation of the heart and arteries.

The heart is usually found relaxed or the left ventricle contracted in systole, while the right is relaxed.

Their stomachs are like sackbuts, with systole and diastole;128 and thus they contract and expand them in a wonderful manner.

That the intrinsic motion of the heart is the systole, and not the diastole, as previously imagined.

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systems theorysystolic