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View synonyms for tabernacle

tabernacle

[ tab-er-nak-uhl ]

noun

  1. any place or house of worship, especially one designed for a large congregation.
  2. (often initial capital letter) the portable sanctuary in use by the Israelites from the time of their wandering in the wilderness after the Exodus from Egypt to the building of the Temple in Jerusalem by Solomon. Exodus 25–27.
  3. Ecclesiastical. an ornamental receptacle for the reserved Eucharist, now generally found on the altar.
  4. a canopied niche or recess, as for an image or icon.
  5. a temporary dwelling or shelter, as a tent or hut.
  6. a dwelling place.
  7. the human body as the temporary abode of the soul.


verb (used with or without object)

, tab·er·nac·led, tab·er·nac·ling.
  1. to place or dwell in, or as if in, a tabernacle.

tabernacle

/ ˈtæbəˌnækəl /

noun

  1. often capital Old Testament
    1. the portable sanctuary in the form of a tent in which the ancient Israelites carried the Ark of the Covenant (Exodus 25–27)
    2. the Jewish Temple regarded as the shrine of the divine presence
  2. Judaism an English word for sukkah
  3. a meeting place for worship used by Mormons or Nonconformists
  4. a small ornamented cupboard or box used for the reserved sacrament of the Eucharist
  5. the human body regarded as the temporary dwelling of the soul
  6. RC Church a canopied niche or recess forming the shrine of a statue
  7. nautical a strong framework for holding the foot of a mast stepped on deck, allowing it to be swung down horizontally to pass under low bridges, etc


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Derived Forms

  • ˌtaberˈnacular, adjective
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Other Words From

  • tab·er·nac·u·lar [tab-er-, nak, -y, uh, -ler], adjective
  • un·taber·nacled adjective
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Word History and Origins

Origin of tabernacle1

First recorded in 1200–50; Middle English, from Late Latin tabernāculum “tent,” equivalent to tabern(a) “hut, stall, inn” + -āculum, probably extracted from hibernāculum “winter quarters”; tavern, hibernaculum.
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Word History and Origins

Origin of tabernacle1

C13: from Latin tabernāculum a tent, from taberna a hut; see tavern
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Example Sentences

The Buffalo News described him a regular at the State Tabernacle Church of God where he would welcome people in.

From Time

While there has been a plethora of virtual classes offering fitness routines, yoga and guided exercises, there are some who are religiously committed to actually showing UP to the tabernacles of gains.

From Ozy

King says in a sermon a month later at Tabernacle Baptist Church in Selma, Alabama.

He could hire the Mormon Tabernacle Choir to follow Gingrich around singing “Once, Twice, Three Times a Lady” at campaign stops.

In this tabernacle were people in black and white from ages past, present, and future.

But you carried a tabernacle for your Moloch, and the image of your idols, the star of your god, which you made to yourselves.

Tabernacle was in the distance, while men and women waded through the soggy snows to be the first to reach the train.

Given in the presence of the sheriff, of Ba'tiste Renaud, of myself, and the various citizens of Tabernacle that you see here?

Then I went to Tabernacle and learned that he had bought a ticket for Boston, and that he had left on a morning train.

That tabernacle he had never seen; that ark he knew had long vanished out of sight.

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