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View synonyms for tabloid

tabloid

[ tab-loid ]

noun

  1. a newspaper whose pages, usually five columns wide, are about one-half the size of a standard-sized newspaper page.
  2. a newspaper this size concentrating on sensational and lurid news, usually heavily illustrated.
  3. a short form or version; condensation; synopsis; summary.


adjective

  1. compressed or condensed in or as if in a tabloid:

    a tabloid article; a tabloid account of the adventure.

  2. luridly or vulgarly sensational.

tabloid

/ ˈtæblɔɪd /

noun

  1. a newspaper with pages about 30 cm (12 inches) by 40 cm (16 inches), usually characterized by an emphasis on photographs and a concise and often sensational style Compare broadsheet
  2. modifier designed to appeal to a mass audience or readership; sensationalist

    tabloid television

    the tabloid press



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Other Words From

  • tabloid·ism noun

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Word History and Origins

Origin of tabloid1

First recorded in 1905–10; tabl(et) + -oid

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Word History and Origins

Origin of tabloid1

C20: from earlier Tabloid, a trademark for a medicine in tablet form

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Example Sentences

The rising tabloid industry created the infrastructure for the Bennifer press phenomenon.

From Vox

The objectification of Britney Spears was in every headline, tabloid report, paparazzi chase, late-night comedy joke, and ensuing media circus that financially capitalized on her struggles.

America has become intimately familiar with a number of characters who, before about five years ago, made most of their media appearances in the New York City tabloids.

The family drama that would play out on a TV show is now better suited for the immediacy of Instagram Stories, TikToks, and TMZ-like online tabloids.

As Joseph Longo wrote for MEL last year, social media birthed a “new tabloid renaissance.”

All this buzz, the continued tabloid fascination with Hurley, is down—absurdly—to that dress.

Constand claimed that the accusation was patently false, and demanded $150,000 in damages from the tabloid and attorney.

She agreed to meet with tabloid editors in New York City and take a lie detector test to back up her claims.

The firing of a new executive brought in to shake up the flailing show is getting dead-movie-star tabloid coverage.

In 2005, the tabloid was set to publish an exposé on Cosby, featuring allegations from new self-described Cosby victims.

She wrote tabloid dramas, drove her own car, dressed smartly, and took a great interest in Maxwell's career.

A series of choice, tabloid talks—a spiritual meditation for every day in the year.

"Another aspirin is going to turn my luck," she thought, and therewith swallowed surreptitiously her last tabloid of the panacea.

Here is the whole art of flying in a tabloid as it were, with all its significance at last in evidence.

The tabloid ghost can communicate more thrills than the one in diluted narration.

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