takeoff

or take-off

[ teyk-awf, -of ]
/ ˈteɪkˌɔf, -ˌɒf /

noun

a taking or setting off; the leaving of the ground, as in leaping or in beginning a flight in an airplane.
a taking off from a starting point, as in beginning a race.
the place or point at which a person or thing takes off.
a humorous or satirical imitation; burlesque.
Machinery. a shaft geared to a main shaft for running auxiliary machinery.
a branch connection to a pipe, electric line, etc.

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Origin of takeoff

First recorded in 1820–30; noun use of verb phrase take off
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for takeoff

British Dictionary definitions for takeoff

take off

verb (adverb)

noun takeoff

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with takeoff

take off

1

Remove, as in Take off your coat and stay for a while, or I took my foot off the brake. [c. 1300]

2

Deduct, decrease, as in He took 20 percent off the original price, or I want you to trim my hair, but please don't take off too much. [c. 1700]

3

Carry or take away, as in The passengers were taken off one by one. [Late 1800s]

4

Also, take oneself off. Leave, go away, as in I'm taking off now, or We take ourselves off for China next month, or, as an imperative, Take yourself off right now! [First half of 1800s]

5

Move forward quickly, as in The dog took off after the car.

6

Become well known or popular, or achieve sudden growth, as in That actor's career has really taken off, or Sales took off around the holidays. [Mid-1900s]

7

Rise in flight, as in The airplane took off on time. [Mid-1800s]

8

Discontinue, as in The railroad took off the commuter special. [Mid-1700s]

9

Imitate humorously or satirically, as in He had a way of taking off the governor that made us howl with laughter. [Mid-1700s]

10

Withhold service, as in I'm taking off from work today because of the funeral. [First half of 1900s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.