takeoff

or take-off

[ teyk-awf, -of ]
/ ˈteɪkˌɔf, -ˌɒf /

noun

a taking or setting off; the leaving of the ground, as in leaping or in beginning a flight in an airplane.
a taking off from a starting point, as in beginning a race.
the place or point at which a person or thing takes off.
a humorous or satirical imitation; burlesque.
Machinery. a shaft geared to a main shaft for running auxiliary machinery.
a branch connection to a pipe, electric line, etc.

Origin of takeoff

First recorded in 1820–30; noun use of verb phrase take off
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for takeoff

Word Origin and History for takeoff

takeoff


n.

also take-off, "caricature," colloquial, 1846, from earlier sense of "thing that detracts from something, drawback" (1826), from take (v.) + off. Meaning "act of becoming airborne" is from 1904 in reference to aircraft; in reference to jumping, it is attested from 1869.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper