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tender

1
[ ten-der ]
/ ˈtɛn dər /
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See synonyms for: tender / tendered / tenderer / tendering on Thesaurus.com

adjective, ten·der·er, ten·der·est.

noun

Usually ten·ders .
  1. a strip of chicken meat loosely attached to the underside of each breast half, along the breastbone.
  2. a boneless and skinless strip of chicken cut from the breast or thigh.

verb (used with object)

to make tender: He tendered the meat in his special marinade before throwing it on the grill.
Archaic. to regard or treat tenderly.

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Origin of tender

1
First recorded in 1175–1225; Middle English, variant of tendre, from Old French, from Latin tenerum, accusative of tener “tender”
ten·der·ly, adverbten·der·ness, nounself-ten·der·ness, nounun·ten·der·ly, adverb
tender , tenor, tenure

Definition for tender (2 of 3)

tender2
[ ten-der ]
/ ˈtɛn dər /

verb (used with object)

verb (used without object)

to make or submit a bid (often followed by for).

noun

Origin of tender

2
First recorded in 1535–45; earlier tendre, noun use of Anglo-French tendre “to extend, offer”; see tend1
1. See offer.
ten·der·er, noun

Definition for tender (3 of 3)

tender3
[ ten-der ]
/ ˈtɛn dər /

noun

a person who tends; a person who attends to or takes charge of someone or something.
an auxiliary ship employed to attend one or more other ships, as for supplying provisions.
a dinghy carried or towed by a yacht.
Railroads. a car attached to a steam locomotive for carrying fuel and water.

Origin of tender

3
First recorded in 1425–75; late Middle English; originally a variant of attender; see tend2, -er1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

British Dictionary definitions for tender (1 of 3)

tender1
/ (ˈtɛndə) /

adjective

verb

(tr) rare
  1. to make tender
  2. to treat tenderly
tenderly, adverbtenderness, noun
C13: from Old French tendre, from Latin tener delicate

British Dictionary definitions for tender (2 of 3)

tender2
/ (ˈtɛndə) /

verb

(tr) to give, present, or offerto tender one's resignation; tender a bid
(intr foll by for) to make a formal offer or estimate for (a job or contract)
(tr) law to offer (money or goods) in settlement of a debt or claim

noun

the act or an instance of tendering; offer
commerce a formal offer to supply specified goods or services at a stated cost or rate
something, esp money, used as an official medium of paymentlegal tender
tenderable, adjectivetenderer, noun
C16: from Anglo-French tendre, from Latin tendere to extend; see tend 1

British Dictionary definitions for tender (3 of 3)

tender3
/ (ˈtɛndə) /

noun

a small boat, such as a dinghy, towed or carried by a yacht or ship
a vehicle drawn behind a steam locomotive to carry the fuel and water
an ancillary vehicle used to carry supplies, spare parts, etc, for a mobile operation, such as an outside broadcast
a person who tends
C15: variant of attender
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for tender

tender
[ tĕndər ]

adj.

Easily crushed or bruised; fragile.
Easily hurt; sensitive.
Painful; sore.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Idioms and Phrases with tender

tender

see leave to someone's tender mercies.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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