tender

1
[ ten-der ]
/ ˈtɛn dər /

adjective, ten·der·er, ten·der·est.

verb (used with object)

to make tender.
Archaic. to regard or treat tenderly.

QUIZZES

How Hip Is Your Lingo? Take Our Slang Quiz!
If you aren’t already skilled in slang, then this quiz can get you up to speed in no time!
Question 1 of 11
OK Boomer can be perceived as pejorative, but it is mostly considered to be _____

Origin of tender

1
1175–1225; Middle English, variant of tendre < Old French < Latin tenerum, accusative of tener tender

OTHER WORDS FROM tender

ten·der·ly, adverbten·der·ness, nounself-ten·der·ness, nounun·ten·der·ly, adverb

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH tender

tender tenor tenure

Definition for tender (2 of 3)

tender2
[ ten-der ]
/ ˈtɛn dər /

verb (used with object)

verb (used without object)

to make or submit a bid (often followed by for).

noun

Origin of tender

2
1535–45; earlier tendre, noun use of Anglo-French tendre to extend, offer. See tend1

SYNONYMS FOR tender

1 See offer.
5 proposal, proffer.

OTHER WORDS FROM tender

ten·der·er, noun

Definition for tender (3 of 3)

tender3
[ ten-der ]
/ ˈtɛn dər /

noun

a person who tends; a person who attends to or takes charge of someone or something.
an auxiliary ship employed to attend one or more other ships, as for supplying provisions.
a dinghy carried or towed by a yacht.
Railroads. a car attached to a steam locomotive for carrying fuel and water.

Origin of tender

3
1425–75; late Middle English; orig. aphetic variant of attender; see tend2, -er1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for tender

British Dictionary definitions for tender (1 of 3)

tender1
/ (ˈtɛndə) /

adjective

verb

(tr) rare
  1. to make tender
  2. to treat tenderly

Derived forms of tender

tenderly, adverbtenderness, noun

Word Origin for tender

C13: from Old French tendre, from Latin tener delicate

British Dictionary definitions for tender (2 of 3)

tender2
/ (ˈtɛndə) /

verb

(tr) to give, present, or offerto tender one's resignation; tender a bid
(intr foll by for) to make a formal offer or estimate for (a job or contract)
(tr) law to offer (money or goods) in settlement of a debt or claim

noun

the act or an instance of tendering; offer
commerce a formal offer to supply specified goods or services at a stated cost or rate
something, esp money, used as an official medium of paymentlegal tender

Derived forms of tender

tenderable, adjectivetenderer, noun

Word Origin for tender

C16: from Anglo-French tendre, from Latin tendere to extend; see tend 1

British Dictionary definitions for tender (3 of 3)

tender3
/ (ˈtɛndə) /

noun

a small boat, such as a dinghy, towed or carried by a yacht or ship
a vehicle drawn behind a steam locomotive to carry the fuel and water
an ancillary vehicle used to carry supplies, spare parts, etc, for a mobile operation, such as an outside broadcast
a person who tends

Word Origin for tender

C15: variant of attender
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for tender

tender
[ tĕndər ]

adj.

Easily crushed or bruised; fragile.
Easily hurt; sensitive.
Painful; sore.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Idioms and Phrases with tender

tender

see leave to someone's tender mercies.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.