testudo

[ te-stoo-doh, -styoo- ]
/ tɛˈstu doʊ, -ˈstyu- /

noun, plural tes·tu·di·nes [te-stood-n-eez, -styood-]. /tɛˈstud nˌiz, -ˈstyud-/.

(among the ancient Romans) a movable shelter with a strong and usually fireproof arched roof, used for protection of soldiers in siege operations.
a shelter formed by overlapping oblong shields, held by soldiers above their heads.

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Origin of testudo

1350–1400 for earlier sense “tumor”; 1600–10 for def. 1; Middle English <Latin testūdō tortoise, tortoise shell, siege engine; akin to test2
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

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British Dictionary definitions for testudo

testudo
/ (tɛˈstjuːdəʊ) /

noun plural -dines (-dɪˌniːz)

a form of shelter used by the ancient Roman Army for protection against attack from above, consisting either of a mobile arched structure or of overlapping shields held by the soldiers over their heads

Word Origin for testudo

C17: from Latin: a tortoise, from testa a shell
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012