throwaway

[ throh-uh-wey ]
/ ˈθroʊ əˌweɪ /

adjective

made or intended to be discarded after use or quick examination: a throwaway container; a throwaway brochure.
delivered or expressed casually or extemporaneously: a funny throwaway line that brings applause.

noun

something that is made or intended to be discarded.
a handbill, advertising circular, pamphlet, etc., intended to be discarded after reading.
Also called pushout. Informal. a youth who is unwanted or rejected by his or her family, the school system, or society in general.

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Origin of throwaway

First recorded in 1900–05; adj., noun use of verb phrase throw away
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for throwaway

British Dictionary definitions for throwaway

throwaway
/ (ˈθrəʊəˌweɪ) /

adjective (prenominal)

said or done incidentally, esp for rhetorical effect; casuala throwaway remark
  1. anything designed to be discarded after use rather than reused, refilled, etc; disposable
  2. (as modifier)a throwaway carton

noun

mainly US and Canadian a handbill or advertisement distributed in a public place

verb throw away (tr, adverb)

to get rid of; discard
to fail to make good use of; wasteto throw away all one's money on horses
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with throwaway

throw away

1

Also, throw or toss out. Dispose of, discard, as in This coat is too good to throw away, or Did you throw out the rest of the milk? or She tossed out all his old letters. [First half of 1500s]

2

Waste, fail to use, as in She's thrown away her inheritance on all kinds of foolish enterprises, or He's thrown away his chances for an engineering job. [Mid-1600s]

3

Also, throw out. Utter or perform in an offhand, seemingly careless way, as in He threw away the news that their summer cottage had been broken into, or She threw out some suggestions for changing the bylaws. [First half of 1900s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.