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transfusion

[ trans-fyoo-zhuhn ]
/ trænsˈfyu ʒən /
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Definition of transfusion

noun
the act or process of transfusing.
Medicine/Medical. the direct transferring of blood, plasma, or the like into a blood vessel.
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Origin of transfusion

1570–80; <Latin trānsfūsiōn- (stem of trānsfūsiō) decanting, intermingling, equivalent to trānsfūs(us) (see transfuse) + -iōn--ion
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use transfusion in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for transfusion

transfusion
/ (trænsˈfjuːʒən) /

noun
the act or an instance of transfusing
the injection of blood, blood plasma, etc, into the blood vessels of a patient
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for transfusion

transfusion
[ trăns-fyōōzhən ]

n.
The transfer of whole blood or blood products from one individual to another.
The intravascular injection of physiological saline solution.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Scientific definitions for transfusion

transfusion
[ trăns-fyōōzhən ]

The transfer of blood or a component of blood, such as red blood cells, plasma, or platelets, from one person to another to replace losses caused by injury, surgery, or disease. Donated blood products are tested for blood type and certain infectious diseases and stored in blood banks until they are used. The blood of the donor is shown to be histologically compatible, or crossmatched, with that of the recipient before transfusion. See more at Rh factor. See Note at blood type.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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