trouble

[ truhb-uhl ]
/ ˈtrʌb əl /

verb (used with object), trou·bled, trou·bling.

verb (used without object), trou·bled, trou·bling.

to put oneself to inconvenience, extra effort, or the like.
to be distressed or agitated mentally; worry: She always troubled over her son's solitariness.

noun

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disgruntle

Idioms for trouble

    in trouble, Informal. pregnant out of wedlock (used as a euphemism).

Origin of trouble

1175–1225; (v.) Middle English troublen<Old French troubler<Vulgar Latin *turbulare, derivative of *turbulus turbid, back formation from Latin turbulentusturbulent; (noun) Middle English <Middle French, derivative of troubler

synonym study for trouble

14. See care.

OTHER WORDS FROM trouble

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for trouble

British Dictionary definitions for trouble

trouble
/ (ˈtrʌbəl) /

noun

verb

Derived forms of trouble

troubled, adjectivetroubler, noun

Word Origin for trouble

C13: from Old French troubler, from Vulgar Latin turbulāre (unattested), from Late Latin turbidāre, from turbidus confused, from turba commotion
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with trouble

trouble

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.