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truckle

[ truhk-uhl ]
/ ˈtrʌk əl /
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See synonyms for: truckle / truckler on Thesaurus.com

noun
a pulley.
verb (used without object), truck·led, truck·ling.
to submit or yield obsequiously or tamely (usually followed by to): Don't truckle to unreasonable demands.
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Origin of truckle

First recorded in 1375–1425 for def. 2; def. 1 was first recorded in 1630–40; def. 3 in 1665–75; late Middle English noun trocle, trokel “sheave, roller,” from Anglo-French, from Latin trochlea; the verb is a special use of obsolete truckle “to sleep on a truckle bed” (because such beds were stored underneath a standard bed); see origin at trochlea

OTHER WORDS FROM truckle

truckler, nountruck·ling·ly, adverbun·truck·led, adjectiveun·truck·ling, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use truckle in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for truckle (1 of 2)

truckle1
/ (ˈtrʌkəl) /

verb
(intr usually foll by to) to yield weakly; give in

Derived forms of truckle

truckler, noun

Word Origin for truckle

C17: from obsolete truckle to sleep in a truckle bed; see truckle ²

British Dictionary definitions for truckle (2 of 2)

truckle2
/ (ˈtrʌkəl) /

noun
a small wheel; caster
a small barrel-shaped cheese
verb
(intr) to roll on truckles
(tr) to push (a piece of furniture) along on truckles

Word Origin for truckle

C15 trokel, from Anglo-Norman trocle, from Latin trochlea sheaf of a pulley; see trochlea
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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