Nearby words

  1. tucana,
  2. tuchis,
  3. tuchman,
  4. tuchman, barbara wertheim,
  5. tuchun,
  6. tuck away,
  7. tuck in,
  8. tuck into,
  9. tuck shop,
  10. tuck-point

Origin of tuck

1
before 900; Middle English t(o)uken to stretch (cloth), torment, Old English tūcian to torment; akin to Middle Low German tucken to tug, German zucken to jerk. See tow1

Related formsun·tucked, adjective

tuck

2
[ tuhk ]
/ tʌk /

noun Informal.

Origin of tuck

2
by shortening and respelling

tuck

3
[ tuhk ]
/ tʌk /

noun Archaic.

a rapier or estoc.

Origin of tuck

3
1500–10; earlier tocke, apparently sandhi variant of obsolete stock sword < Italian stocco < German Stock stick; cognate with stock

tuck

4
[ tuhk ]
/ tʌk /

noun Chiefly Scot.

a drumbeat or the sound of one beat on a drum.

Origin of tuck

4
1300–50; Middle English tukken to beat, sound (said of a drum) < Middle French (north) toker to strike, touch. See touch

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for tuck


British Dictionary definitions for tuck

tuck

1
/ (tʌk) /

verb

noun

See also tuck away, tuck in

Word Origin for tuck

C14: from Old English tūcian to torment; related to Middle Dutch tucken to tug, Old High German zucchen to twitch

noun

archaic a rapier

Word Origin for tuck

C16: from French estoc sword, from Old French: tree trunk, sword, of Germanic origin

noun

a touch, blow, or stroke

verb

(tr) to touch or strike
(intr) to throb or bump

Word Origin for tuck

C16: from Middle English tukken to beat a drum, from Old Northern French toquer to touch; compare tucket

Tuck

/ (tʌk) /

noun

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for tuck

tuck

v.

late 14c., "to pull or gather up," earlier "to pluck, stretch" (late 13c., implied in tucker), probably from Middle Low German or Middle Dutch tucken "pull up, draw up, tug" (cognate with Old English tucian "mistreat, torment," and related to Old English togian "to pull," German zucken; see tow). Sense of "thrust into a snug place" is first recorded 1580s. Slang meaning "to consume, swallow" is recorded from 1784. The noun is first attested late 14c.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with tuck

tuck

In addition to the idioms beginning with tuck

  • tuck away
  • tuck in
  • tuck into

also see:

  • nip and tuck
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.